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Must See Movies

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Conza88 Posted: Thu, Nov 5 2009 12:48 PM

The point of this is to create a list of worthwhile films / movies / TV shows & series, that relate in a major way with an issue or issues this movement stands for. So make way for the propaganda! The hope is that these can be used to subtly influence family members, friends, co-workers - as a starting point, or supplement to getting them to turn off the television and start really thinking for themselves.

Obviously not all of the below are 'pure', but I believe them to have more positives than negative. I also think it is important to try understand the main message / moral of the story, and how someone who has not yet been enlightened by liberty would interpret the film.

Some movies are great on issues like individualism vs collectivism, but then might fall down in other areas. So if you have seen the film recently, and don't think that it belongs (negatives outweigh positives) definitely speak up. By all means, discuss the films... if you have seen a film, and recommend it - please give it a shout out..

Other issues to look out for below include; self responsibility over paternalism, anti-war, dystopia's, anti-big brother, justice, against collectivism, conspiracy (self interested politicians), anti-green agenda, bureaucracy, entrepreneurship, corporatism, the mafia, revolutions, drugs, corruption, police, pre-crime, mass media, ruling elites to name a few.   

What did I miss? Movies, shows, films that enlighten about the current state of affairs, as well as heed warning & inform should be added here. Also maybe provide a synopsis or blurb about it, as to why its such a classic / you are recommending it.

12 Angry Men (1957)
1984 (1984)
2081(2009)
300 (2007)

A

Antz (1998)
American History X (1998)
A Midnight Clear (1992)
A Man For All Seasons (1966)
Amazing Grace (2007)
Amistad (1997)
Akira (1988)
A Clockwork Orange (1971)
Apocalypse Now (1979)
All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
Animal Farm (1999)
All the King's Men (1949)
Arlington Road (1999)
Alien (1979)
Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)
Army of Shadows (1969)
Appaloosa (2008)
The Americanization of Emily (1964)

B

Bananas (1971)
Batman Begins (2005)
Battle of Algiers (1967)
Birth of a Nation (1915)
Blade Runner (1982)
Blazing Saddles (1974)
Brother Sun, Sister Moon (1972)
Brazil (1985)
Braveheart (1995)
Breach (2007)
Breaker Morant (1980)
Bourne Ultimatum (2007)
Born on the Forth of July (1989)
Boom Town (1940)
Burnt By the Sun (1994)
Bulworth (1998)
The Brotherhood of the Bell (1970)
Bury My Heart At wounded Knee (2007)
The Balcony (1963)
The Bank Job (2008)
The Beyond (1983)

C

Caddyshack (1980)
Casualties of War (1989)
Casino (1995)
Cavalcade (1993)
Citizen Kane (1941)
City of God (2002)
Children of Men (2006)
Cinderella Man (2005)
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Cool Hand Luke (1967)
The Castle (1997)
The City of Ember (2008)
Captain Blood (1935)
Cinema Paradiso (1988)

D

Dr. Strangelove (1964)
Dark City (1998)
Death of a President (2006)
Duck Soup (1933)
Dr. Zhivago (1965)
Dollar's Trilogy (1964)
Demolition Man (1993)
Defiance (2008)
Dark Knight (2008)
  The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
The Deer Hunter (1978)

E

Election (1999)
Enemy of the State (1998)
Enemy at the Gates (2001)
Escape From New York (1981)
Europa, Europa (1990)
Equilibrium (2002)
Eagle Eye (2008)

F

Farewell My Concubine (1993)
Fahrenheit 451 (1966)
Fight Club (1999)
Finding Nemo (2003)
Firefly (2002)
The Fountainhead (1949)
Full Metal Jacket (1987)
First Blood (1982)

G

Grave of the Fireflies (1988)
Gandhi (1982)
Good Night and Good Luck (2005)
Goodfellas (1990)
Gladiator (2000)
Gone With the Wind (1939)
Gallipoli (1981)
Grand Illusion (1937)
Ghost Busters (1984)
Gattaca (1997)
Gran Torino (2008)
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966)
The Godfather Trilogy (1972)


H

Hate (1995)
Harry's War (1981)
Harrison Bergeron (1995)
High Noon (1952)
Hot Fuzz (2007)
House of Cards (1990)

I

Its a wonderful life (1946)
Into The Wild (2007)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
Idiocracy (2006)
I, Robot (2004)
Iron Man (2008)
The International (2009)
Independence Day (1996)
The Inner Circle (1991)
The Incredibles (2004)

J

Jacob's Ladder (1980)
Jericho (2006)
JFK (1991)
John Adams (2008)
Johnny Got His Gun (1971)
Joyeux Noel (2005)

K

The King of Hearts (1966)
The Killing Fields (1984)
The Kite Runner (2007)

L

Land of the Blind (2006)
Laggan - Once Upon a Time in India (2001)
La Vallee (1972)
L'America (1994)
Lord of the Rings (2001)
Lord of War (2005)
Logan's Run (1976)
The Leopard (1963)
Legends of the Fall (1994)
Lorenzo's Oil (1992)
Little House on the Prairie (1974)
The Last Castle (2001)

M

Metropolis (1927)
Minority Report (2002)
Mad Max (1979)
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)
The Matrix Trilogy (1999)
Manchurian Candidate (1962)
Metropolitan (1990)
The Mouse that Roared (1959)
The Man in the White Suit (1951)
The Man Who Would Be King (1975)

N

No Man's Land (2001)
Natural Born Killers (1994)
The Network (1976)

O

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
Once Were Warriors (1995)
The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)

P

Prison Break (2005)
Paths of Glory (1957)
Pursuit of Happyness (2006)
The Patriot (2000)
Pump Up the Volume (1990)
Porco Rosso (1992)
The Prisoner (1967)
The Path to 9/11 (2006)
The Promise (1979)
The Pentagon Wars (1998)
The Philadelphia Experiment (1984)

R

Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)
Red Dawn (1984)
Robocop
(1987)
Rendition (2007)
Runaway Jury (2003)
The Rules of the Game (1939)
The Ruling Class (1972)
Requiem For A Dream (2000)
Rollover (1981)
Reds (1981)
Road to Perdition (2002)
The Running Man (1987)
The Road Warrior (1981)

S

Scarface (1983)
Shawshank Redemption (1994)
Shindlers List (1993)
Sleeper (1973)
Star Wars (1977)
Serenity (2005)
Simpsons Movie (2007)
South Park - Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999)
Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005)
Stalker (1979)Saving Private Ryan (1998)
Shooter (2007)
Stalingrad (1993)
Seven Days in May (1966)
Shenandoah (1965) Snow Falling on Cedars (1999)
Sunshine (2007)
Salvador (1986)
Serpico (1973)
Spy Game (2001)Skulls (2000)Sneakers (1992)
The Seven Samuri (1954)
Soylent Green (1973)
Spartacus (1960)
The Siege At Ruby Ridge (1996)
The Siege (1981)
The Searchers (1956)

T

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War (2004)
Tailor of Panama (2001)
The Third Man (1949)
Tucker: A Man and His Dream (1988)
Three Kings (1999)
Total Recall (1990)
The Third Man (1949)
The Thin Red Line (1998)
Time Bandits (1981)
THX 1138 (1971)
Touch Of Evil (1958)
The Twilight Zone Series (1959)
The Truman Show (1998)
They Live (1988)
Team America: World Police (2004)
Terminator Trilogy (1984)
Tron (1982)
Tucker: A Man and His Dream (1988)
Time Bandits (1981)
Thank You For Not Smoking (2005)
Twelve Monkeys (1995)
The Quiet American (2002)

U

Underground (1995)
Unforgiven (1992)
The Usual Suspects (1995)

V

Valkyrie (2008)
V for Vendetta (2005)
V (1984)

W

Wall-E (2008)
Watership Down (1978)
Wall Street (1987)
'War Inc.' (2008)
WarGames (1983)
Wag the Dog (1997)
What About Bob? (1991)
War Letters: American Experience (2002)
The White Rose (1983)
The Wire (2002)
Wild River (1960)

X

X-men (2000)
X-Files (1993)
Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl (1998)

 

If I missed something, recommend it. If you don't understand why something is there, investigate and ask. If you don't think it should be there, make a case for it's removal. These were collected by myself at RPF with the help of others. I have updated it considerably, this is the most up to date version. Reviews were gleaned from here at Mises, LewRockwell for starters. Enjoy! Smile

Ron Paul is for self-government when compared to the Constitution. He's an anarcho-capitalist. Proof.
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you12 replied on Thu, Nov 5 2009 1:30 PM

I doubt if there is any film that portrays anarchy in positive light. The list you have is just a general list of good movies. And its far too long to discuss in detail.

For example Citizen Kane is about a man not finding satisfaction in material wealth. Not relevant to anarchy and capitalism. Same with Wall- E , the usual suspects...

 

It would be far better to create a list of documentaries as we will be able recommend and share stuff that is actually relevant. I suggest  anything by Adam Curtis.

 

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The only one I would add would be "Boondock Saints".

Periodically the tree of liberty must be watered with the blood of tyrants and patriots.

Thomas Jefferson

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xahrx replied on Thu, Nov 5 2009 2:56 PM

you12:
The list you have is just a general list of good movies. And its far too long to discuss in detail.

My thoughts too.  Listing the supposed theme of the movie next to it would have at least helped.  But no list of recommended whatevers should be so long, people have limited time to devote to such things.

What would be nice is if the Libertarian/Anarchist movement had it's own director, like a mix of Ken Burns and Michael Moore, but capitalists.  I think John Carpenter and Kurt Russel both lean toward libertarian views, but in hearing them speak they seem to equate libertarian with social issues/policy more so than economic issues/policy.  I doubt either is interested to the point of becoming associated with an ideology or movement.  Still, there's no real popularizer of free market ideas out there who can successfully point out the issues.  I mean, even in Moore's pics he goes after the government sometimes, but for some reason no matter how deeply rooted the government is in the 'problem' he sees, he also invariably presents government as the solution.  This to me is the ultimate issue to address.  Whenever I talk or argue with people it always comes down to the idea that the government could 'work' in 'the right people' were in charge or if it would just do this or that, modify this or that approach slightly.  A popularizer of libertarian and anarchist views would have to somehow try and get people to make the jump from seeing that it's a not a problem within the government, but that government is the problem.  It doesn't and more importantly can't work as they wish it would.

"I was just in the bathroom getting ready to leave the house, if you must know, and a sudden wave of admiration for the cotton swab came over me." - Anonymous
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Andrew replied on Thu, Nov 5 2009 3:53 PM

The new Battlestar Gallactica District 9

Democracy is nothing more than replacing bullets with ballots

 

If Pro is the opposite of Con. What is the opposite of Progress?

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Changeling (Angelina Jolie) is based on a true story of corruption in 20's LA.

Democracy means the opportunity to be everyone's slave.—Karl Kraus.

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firstly, why alien? Granted no movie is devoid of statism but alien always seemed to me to be the story of corporate corruption par excellence.

Now for the suggestions: 

Macross DYRL -a great cartoon movie about (from a libertarian perspective) a band of relatively free humans fighting a race of culture-less, socialistic giants bent on anihilating the last remnants of human creativity.  At the end the power of human bourgeois music converts them to peace. (note: there is no backstory so unless you like macross the TV show or robotech, you ain't gonna like this)

Transformers the movie -another cartoon movie which serves as the best allegory of the fight between freedom and statism that I've seen. Basically it's about a giant transformer that eats planets and how the other transformers have to beat it. The main character uses a "matrix of leadership" to defeat the planet-eater. 

Gods and Generals: It extols the virtues of the southern drive for independence so right of the bat it is more libertarian then most war movies.

and finally, Footloose -the classic tale of kevin bacon versus the town government and it's anti-dancing law. 

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Stephen replied on Thu, Nov 5 2009 10:52 PM

In general, I think romantic western and mafia movies are the best since they demonstrate an alternative order to the state. I would generally go for ones which emphasize basic decency and honour. I don't approve of Goodfellows bc it's too nihilistic and unrealistic. Donnie Brasco should be on the list. I don't know why the Wire is there either. Don't think Scarface should be there. Red Dawn links to Robocop. The recent Law Abiding Citizen is a candidate. It was good until he started killing innocent ppl. I would also add The Devil's Own, Michael Collins, and Taken to the list. I also really liked the underline theme of the anime series, Berserk, where the main antagonist, Grffith, is the romanticized tyrant par excellance.

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Spideynw replied on Thu, Nov 5 2009 11:15 PM

Conza88, you have way too much time on your hands.

At most, I think only 5% of the adult population would need to stop cooperating to have real change.

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Spideynw:

Conza88, you have way too much time on your hands.

I think he developed that list a while ago.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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I think John Carpenter and Kurt Russel both lean toward libertarian views, but in hearing them speak they seem to equate libertarian with social issues/policy more so than economic issues/policy.

Clint Eastwood doesn't shy away from calling himself a libertarian. And since you include actors, Drew Carey (Reason contributor) is another to 'consider'. As well as Trey Parker and Matt Stone.

But hey, as an aspiring filmmaker, I'll happily take up the challenge. Wink I've actually been writing a legal thriller set in an anarcho-capitalist society (basically a 120-page response to the supposed need for a final arbiter and the prospect of endless warfare between firms).

To the OP, you have far more films than I imagined, but I think I've found some you missed:

There Will Be Blood. Though hailed by many as an example of the dangers of greed, we need to remember that capitalism is not synonymous with greed. Daniel Plainview's speech to the townspeople about how their town will improve due to his drilling for oil (there will be a railroad, schools will be built, granaries set up, etc) is a great illustration of a capitalist's self-interested actions helping society at large. And Plainview, portrayed as being so competitive as to be mentally unstable, still cares for his workers and respects other's claim to property, even when there is a lonely hold out impeding his progress.

The Big Lebowski. The hero is a marijuana smoking pacifist that, by seeking to decrease a felt uneasiness (the rug really tied the room together), ultimately uncovers fraud. The police are portrayed as either useless or belligerent - the sheriff of Malibu calls it his beach community, and believes he has the power to decide who is and is not allowed in. He then assaults the Dude.

And since you included Firefly (good for you!), I imagine TV shows are applicable. In that case:

Deadwood. As a western, it kinda has to have libertarian sentiments. But on what other show will you see a government established in a whore house, with the self-appointed mayor saying things like, "More than providing services to 'em, taking people's money is what makes organizations real, be they formal, informal or temporary." It shares quite a few similarities with There Will Be Blood. Al Swearengen, like Daniel Plainview, is murderous, but still holds some respect for the property of others, as he tries to gain possession of a gold claim. The same is true for George Hearst, the real parallel to Plainview. Hearst is far worse than Plainview, though he also has a few inspiring monologues about the wonders of capitalism.

"Before the color, no white man - no man of any hue - moved to civilize or improve a place like this had reason to make the effort. The color brought commerce here, and such order as has been attained. Do you want to help Liberia, Odell?"

"I want to help myself. If Liberia is where my chance is, it's all right with me."

"Gold is your chance. Gold is every man's opportunity. And why do I make that argument? Because every defect in a man and in others' way of taking him, our agreement that gold has value gives us power to rise above. ...Gold confers power. Power comes to any man who has the color."

"Even if he's black?"

"That is our species' hope, Odell! That, uniformly agreeing on its value, we organize to seek the color!"

He then promises to burn down the camp, but come on! The series also illustrates Hoppe's concept of natural elites, at least as I understand Hoppe. The principal characters organize a response to several social crises, dealing with such issues as hostile neighbors, a plague, inevitable annexation by the US, etc. They take it upon themselves for moral reasons (arguably Seth Bullock) and pure selfish, business-related reasons (Al Swearengen, Cy Tolliver, etc.).

Arrested Development. Mostly because it's a good show. But it does portray the government as clueless and ultimately criminal, as it forces George Sr. to conduct illegal transactions and then jails him for it. It also criticizes Bush and the war in Iraq quite frequently.

I'm glad you have Wall-E in the list. I found it to be one of the most individualistic movies last year.

EDIT: And Stephen mentioned an anime, which reminds me of Full Metal Alchemist. It is set in a society in which there is a Prussian-like love of the state (more than you can imagine), while some characters bemoan the frequent wars initiated by the state. The state is ultimately seen as an institution to make war, in order to further the villain's goal.

"People kill each other for prophetic certainties, hardly for falsifiable hypotheses." - Peter Berger
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bigwig replied on Fri, Nov 6 2009 1:48 AM

Primer. I can't recommend it highly enough. Watch it on Google Video and don't read the wikipedia article.

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Conza88 replied on Fri, Nov 6 2009 3:34 AM

you12:
I doubt if there is any film that portrays anarchy in positive light.

The best I think would be Porco Rosso. "Porco Rosso: An anarcho-capitalist pig?" - seen it, it's pretty awesome.

As for others - V for Vendetta... and basically the movies that deplore the state, big brother etc.. indirectly put anarchy in a positive light, because they do not offer an alternative, only that the leviathan is evil. 

you12:
For example Citizen Kane is about a man not finding satisfaction in material wealth. Not relevant to anarchy and capitalism. Same with Wall- E , the usual suspects...

Yeah, I am in agreement with Citizen Kane - I got the same 'moral' of the story when I saw it. Wall-E I have not seen, but it is about individualism from what others have said, and someone on lew rockwell blogged in favour of it.

Usual suspects have not seen either. Will look into both though.

you12:
It would be far better to create a list of documentaries as we will be able recommend and share stuff that is actually relevant. I suggest  anything by Adam Curtis.


Well I have already done that as well, last year some time. I'll fix it up shortly.

fakename:
firstly, why alien? Granted no movie is devoid of statism but alien always seemed to me to be the story of corporate corruption par excellence.

I was leaning against that as well. Will take it out. And add the suggestions, all of which were suggested elsewhere but I didn't add. Will update a lot at once, because the amount of links - means it needs to get admin approval. :)

Ron Paul is for self-government when compared to the Constitution. He's an anarcho-capitalist. Proof.
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Conza88 replied on Fri, Nov 6 2009 3:35 AM

xahrx:
you12:
The list you have is just a general list of good movies. And its far too long to discuss in detail.

My thoughts too.  Listing the supposed theme of the movie next to it would have at least helped.  But no list of recommended whatevers should be so long, people have limited time to devote to such things.

Well the list was 320 responses condensed into one post.

That is a good idea though. I could possibly add 'tags' after the links to show what issues the movie / series is associated with & why it is on the list. Not sure I have the time for that at the moment. On going project so we'll see.

Additionally, there could be an overt / covert element. The movies like the Matrix, V for Vendetta, 1984 could be considered 'overt' since the message is explicit, while others are less obvious but still useful.

The goal was to first collate and then it can probably be whittled down into a "Best of" or "Top 10".

Daniel:
Spideynw:
Conza88, you have way too much time on your hands.
I think he developed that list a while ago.

Yeah, a year ago. I just had to copy and paste it, then add some links and new suggestions.

Got interested in it again as I used a gift-voucher to get a external hard drive. I like to collect anti-status quo, individualist dystopia books (Brave New World, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, This Perfect Day, 1984, Animal Farm etc.) and then extended that to media.

Some movies are pretty hard to get online, as well as offline and since *,000's of Ron Paul clips from supporters were removed because of 'copy right violations' recently on youtube and are now lost unless that person uploads it again, I thought it might be expedient to download & collect the films that have the same message; as my government plans to censor the internet - and I'd like to store them offline.

Ron Paul is for self-government when compared to the Constitution. He's an anarcho-capitalist. Proof.
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I'm sorry Conza, but I have to do this in all caps, because I'm screaming it in my head.  They might not fit the propaganda shtick so well, but they deserve to be on a movie list:

 

CASABLANCA (Play it Sam.  I don't know if I can remember-If you could play it for her you can play it for me, now play it!)

TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT (You know how to whistle don't you Steve?  You just put your lips together, and blow.)

 

To a lesser extent, any and all Humphrey Bogart movies (The Big Sleep is another good one),  and the Dollars Trilogy.

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brianj replied on Fri, Nov 6 2009 8:25 AM

Apocalypto (2006). See this review posted at LRC.

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As has been suggested above, grouping them according to theme may be a good idea as well as producing smaller top 5 lists may be the most useful. Also of consideration when compiling these lists is to have a high regard for artistic quality as well doctrinal purity. Otherwise we'll end up like the Christians who'll watch anything however bad as long as it a Jesus Saves banner appears during the film; I'm a slightly more discerning Christian than that.

That being said I have a few films/programmes which are good artistically and politically-

The Trial A fantastic nightmarish adaptation of Kaftka's novel directed by Orson Welles. It shows the inherent maliciousness, inefficiency and pointlessness of the totalitarian regime. It's essentially an existentialist film so ranks very high on individualism and the importance of finding your own meaning; the latter I'm sympathetic too but assumes there isn't an objective meaning for anything.

The War Games (Dr Who story from the late 60s) It shows the callousness of government in war and how sometimes how the leaders of opposing forces are really on the same side; seems like a good evaluation of modern politics.

Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (TV series) It is just the best satire of the British political system ever made: hilarious and incisive, political comedy comes no better than this. It is so accurate that if I ever taught a politics class I'd put it down as essential viewing.

Aladdin (Disney film) May seem an odd choice but is certainly a film promoting individual liberty (Jasmine's should be able to choose her own husband) and the importance of truth. A great film for both kids and adults. It will also be a healthy bulwark against the Islamifisation of the West.

The Lives of Others German film about the the Stasi which won best foreign language film at the Oscars a couple of years back. Not necessarily anti-socialist but shows the endemic corruption of the East German state and how even the smallest of actions and persons would be monitored under that system.

Another Doctor Story which is pretty good but not good enough to be recommended is the Seeds of Doom in which the villain is all for plant liberation; an obvious satire of vegetarianism.

Finally I'd like to add my support to There Will Be Blood and to highlight the best artistically and doctrinally film/tv show on your list: The Prisoner.

If you are to only watch one thing off the list it must be this. It is obsolutely brilliant and by far teh best tv serial I have ever seen. Suitable for all the family yet is more profound than most "adult" films is unrelenting in it's defence of personal liberty.

The atoms tell the atoms so, for I never was or will but atoms forevermore be.

Yours sincerely,

Physiocrat

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AJ replied on Fri, Nov 6 2009 10:22 AM

Physiocrat:

Finally I'd like to add my support to There Will Be Blood and to highlight the best artistically and doctrinally film/tv show on your list: The Prisoner.

If you are to only watch one thing off the list it must be this. It is obsolutely brilliant and by far teh best tv serial I have ever seen. Suitable for all the family yet is more profound than most "adult" films is unrelenting in it's defence of personal liberty.

The Prisoner is amazing. People I know that saw it decades ago still refer to it often in casual conversation.

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Conza88:
Daniel:
Spideynw:
Conza88, you have way too much time on your hands.
I think he developed that list a while ago.

Yeah, a year ago. I just had to copy and paste it, then add some links and new suggestions.

Got interested in it again as I used a gift-voucher to get a external hard drive. I like to collect anti-status quo, individualist dystopia books (Brave New World, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, This Perfect Day, 1984, Animal Farm etc.) and then extended that to media.

Some movies are pretty hard to get online, as well as offline and since *,000's of Ron Paul clips from supporters were removed because of 'copy right violations' recently on youtube and are now lost unless that person uploads it again, I thought it might be expedient to download & collect the films that have the same message; as my government plans to censor the internet - and I'd like to store them offline.

Yeah, that is where I remember that list from. Did you ever get unbanned from RPFs?

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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G8R HED replied on Sat, Nov 7 2009 6:49 AM

Oh, man!  You can't leave out Lionel Barrymore in :

"You Can't Take It With You" (1938)

http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0030993/plotsummary

 

 

 

"Oh, I wish I could pray the way this dog looks at the meat" - Martin Luther

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Conza88 replied on Sun, Nov 8 2009 5:38 AM

http://mises.org/journals/lf/1972/1972_06-07.pdf

Arts and Movies
By Mr. First Nighter
Sometimes a Great Nation. dir. by Paul Newman with Newman and
Henry Fonda.

A great libertarian and individualist movie, this film predictably
bombed out with the left-liberal youth that make up the bulk of the New
York movie audience. The picture puzzled them profoundly; it was
starkly individualist, fine; but how come that the great enemy of
individualism turned out to be unions and their goon squads in the
surrounding "community"? And that the heroism of Fonda and his family
consisted in the heinous activity of strikebreaking in order to fulfill their
business contracts in lumbering? The reviewers set the picture down as
glorifying nineteenth-century individualism and its virtues, and that it
does. This is a rugged, heroic, explicitly individualist picture; it is one of
the great ones, and if the Left and the Women's Libbers don't like it, the
appropriate reply is the great gesture of defiance with which Paul
Newman, bloody but unbowed, ends this epic.

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Conza88 replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 12:06 AM

brianj:

Apocalypto (2006). See this review posted at LRC.

Good spot.

Physiocrat:
Aladdin (Disney film) May seem an odd choice but is certainly a film promoting individual liberty (Jasmine's should be able to choose her own husband) and the importance of truth. A great film for both kids and adults. It will also be a healthy bulwark against the Islamifisation of the West.

Yeah, a good addition to a top Kids / Cartoon List for sure.

Physiocrat:
Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (TV series) It is just the best satire of the British political system ever made: hilarious and incisive, political comedy comes no better than this. It is so accurate that if I ever taught a politics class I'd put it down as essential viewing.

Possibly make a top satire category? I've got the series on dvd, very good.

Physiocrat:
Finally I'd like to add my support to There Will Be Blood and to highlight the best artistically and doctrinally film/tv show on your list: The Prisoner.

Just downloaded the entire oldschool series, up to ep. 2 - awesome so far.

Daniel:
Did you ever get unbanned from RPFs?

Nope. Do I want to be? Nope.

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Conza88 replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 12:18 AM

Libertarian Movies You've Never Seen -http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig10/clark-t1.1.1.html

Captain Blood (1935)

Captain Blood stars Errol Flynn at his swashbuckling best. Flynn deservedly shot to stardom as Peter Blood, a 17th-century physician turned pirate after escaping unjust imprisonment for devoting his medical skills to rebels against the English tyrant King James.

Spirited action sequences, highly intellectual dialogue and skilled direction combine to make this film a delight.

Unlike the recent pirate films starring Marxist-Che Guevara sympathizer Johnny Depp, the art and charm of this movie lies in its well-selected background music and acting, not in special effects and buffoonery.

Radiant Olivia de Havilland is Flynn’s ideally cast co-star and romantic interest.

Watch for Flynn’s stirring and eloquent speeches to inspire his pirate crew. Flynn’s superb diction and command of the English language alone are worth the price of admission.


Filled with action, drama, passion, romance, and a story of heroic (and successful!) rebellion against tyranny, Captain Blood is a tale lovers of liberty will enjoy and treasure.

Talk of the Town (1942)

If you have not yet seen this film, you are in for a real treat…and then some. It is as witty, charming, and engaging as any libertarian – and any American – could hope for.

 

The moral background portrayed contrasts strongly with the profanity, violence and explicit sexual innuendo that have become standard in many of today's films.

Cary Grant stars as Leopold Dilg, an outspoken civil libertarian, wrongly imprisoned for arson and murder. To avoid almost certain execution, Leopold breaks out of jail to gather evidence to prove his innocence.

The bad guys of the movie are a corrupt judge and mayor of a small New England town, who make Leopold the fall guy for their insurance scam.

During his escape, Leopold encounters legal scholar Michael Lightcap, played admirably and incomparably by Ronald Coleman in one of his finest roles. Their friendly intellectual exchanges on the nature of the law make the film especially worthy of attention. For example, Leopold says, "What is the law…it’s a gun pointed in someone’s face." Lines like that are seldom heard in current-day movies.


The professor and the escapee team up with lovely and feisty local schoolteacher Nora Shelley (Jean Arthur) to find justice.

The academic theoretician becomes a man of action. In a dramatic and suspenseful courtroom scene, he demonstrates why the right to keep and bear arms is vitally important to the cause of justice. The corrupt politicians are indicted.

In the end, Nora gets her man, but which one? You will need to watch the film to the very end to discover the answer to that most intriguing question.

Unconquered (1947)

Legendary film magnate Cecil B. DeMille captures on the silver screen an important period in American history in this stirring tale of pre-Revolutionary settlers on the frontier.

Gary Cooper stars as peace-loving Chris Holden, a colonial militia Captain who buys and then frees beautiful indentured slave Abby Hale on their voyage to Virginia. Abby had been convicted in England for killing one of the King’s men while successfully defending her honor from attempted outrage.

The action shifts to western Pennsylvania. Slave trader Garth, having failed to have a law passed in England to prohibit settlement west of the Allegheny mountains, ignites a battle between Indian tribes and a small outpost of brave settlers. The film is filled with libertarian nuggets. For example, when Abby (stunning natural redhead Paulette Goddard) is re-taken into slavery, she wistfully remarks, "You don’t know what freedom’s worth until you lose it."


A first-rate historical drama, this film features Howard Da Silva as the treacherous villain Garth and Boris Karloff as the Indian chief Guyasuta. Richard Henry Lee of Virginia and Colonel George Washington are also included as the action unfolds.

Gary Cooper saves the fort, rescues the girl, and defeats the villain in the suspenseful final scene.

Watch for the Ben Franklin quote at the conclusion: Where liberty dwells there is my country.

Tailor of Panama (2001)

No review of libertarian movies would be complete without at least one that takes a skeptical view of misguided American foreign policy. The Tailor of Panama obliges.

Harry Pendel (Geoffrey Rush) is the eponymous tailor of Panama. Born an Englishman, he is a former convict turned tailor to the rich and infamous in Panama. Harry is happily married to Louisa (Jamie Lee Curtis), who happens to be the assistant to the Canal director.

Harry plies his trade as tailor with considerable success, notwithstanding the occasional harmless fabrication – for example, a 40-inch waist is recorded as a "36 plus," the plus being lunch.

Pierce Brosnan’s Andy Oxnard is a dapper British spy, whose only character resemblance to James Bond is his penchant for the ladies. Having been discredited for his numerous indiscretions in Europe, he is exiled to Panama where it is thought by his superiors, that he can do little harm.


Here is where their paths cross, or more accurately, double cross. Andy intimidates Harry to eavesdrop on the Canal director for whom he serves as tailor. Harry's tales and whispers of an impending Chinese take over of the canal are gladly accepted.

Harry is a better tailor than investor. A thieving foreman and a crooked banker conspire to push his real estate investment into failure. Tempted by generous cash gifts from Andy, courtesy of British taxpayers, Harry spins fiction upon fiction. Andy soaks it up, passes it on to London, and keeps the money flowing.

When lack of substance or documentation threatens to end this lucrative scheme, Harry foolishly thinks he can bluff his way out of the deal.

Using this inaccurate and unconfirmed data, the Brits persuade the American military to send in the helicopters. The film clearly portrays the war-hungry Pentagon commanders as a group of inept, almost childish and certainly ludicrous, contemptible men.

Thankfully the combat mission they order is discontinued, but not before a bombardment of innocent civilians and peaceful Panamanian neighborhoods.

If you are looking for an entertaining venue to expose the incredible folly of a foreign policy of intervention by force of arms, this is the film for you.


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Poptech replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 12:43 AM

The most obvious...

Wall-E? Is that a joke? That was a an eco-propaganda, anti-capitalist movie,

WALL-E: Economic Ignorance and the War on Modernity

"Anarchism misunderstands the real nature of man. It would be practicable only in a world of angels and saints" - Ludwig von Mises

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Poptech replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 1:11 AM

I've seen about 90% of those movies and many are stretching being on there, others are incredibly bad (The Thin Red Line),  or boring (Tailor of Panama).I don't get all the mob movies as they have nothing to do with the "message". Does the movement stand for thug brutality and the exploitation of others?

Movies off your list I would actually recommend to people in relation to individualism (you have others I just did not enjoy them),

300 (2007)

Braveheart (1995)

Cinderella Man (2005)

Demolition Man (1993)

Defiance (2008) (Irony though is that it explicitly endorses socialist order in the rebel camp)

Enemy of the State (1998)

Equilibrium (2002)

First Blood (1982)

Joyeux Noel (2005)

Lord of the Rings (2001)

Shawshank Redemption (1994)

Star Wars (1977)

The Patriot (2000)

The Matrix (1999) (I would only recommend the first one, second one was ok, the third was bad)

Tucker: A Man and His Dream (1988)

"Anarchism misunderstands the real nature of man. It would be practicable only in a world of angels and saints" - Ludwig von Mises

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Marko replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 1:40 AM

Nice work. I appreciate it.

1. Wouldn`t go amiss to add Silmido and Only Fools And Horses. Silmido is a decent movie from a Libertarian viewpoint. Not Top10 but a Top300 certainly. It is about the state not keeping its own end of the bargain, because it doesn`t need to. While the magnificent Fools and Horses needs no introduction.

2. Maybe have Independence Day link to this review/recap. Certainly beats the imdb summary. 

3. I think such a huge list is not that helpful. Too much data can be not very informative. Just how valuable is (an unranked) list of best libertarian movies that includes Hot Fuzz? I think a smaller and more considered list would be more valuable. For example a few lists like 25 Best Libertarian Movies, 10 Best Antiwar Movies, 5 Best Dystopian Movies, 5 Best Libertarian Westerns. They would be shorter but there would actually be more information in them.

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Conza88 replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 2:09 AM

Poptech:

The most obvious...

Wall-E? Is that a joke? That was a an eco-propaganda, anti-capitalist movie,

WALL-E: Economic Ignorance and the War on Modernity

Thanks for the link. And thanks for calling it out, as should be done. Others have interpreted it as individualistic, although I'm not sure if that is being generous or not. The movies are open to interpretation, though the point of this is to weed out the ones that are not so obvious / clear to the general public - as being in favor of what we support. 

So I encourage discussion. By the way, still haven't removed the ones brought up earlier, or added any to the list as of yet.

Marko:
Nice work. I appreciate it.

No worries. Not yet done. Smile

Marko:
1. Wouldn`t go amiss to add Silmido and Only Fools And Horses. Silmido is a decent movie from a Libertarian viewpoint. Not Top10 but a Top300 certainly. It is about the state not keeping its own end of the bargain, because it doesn`t need to. While the magnificent Fools and Horses needs no introduction.

Thanks for the movie rating, it helps put it in a ball park.

Marko:
2. Maybe have Independence Day link to this review/recap. Certainly beats the imdb summary.

Good point. Will do.

Marko:
3. I think such a huge list is not that helpful. Too much data can be not very informative. Just how valuable is a list of best libertarian movies that includes Hot Fuzz? I think a smaller and more considered list would be more valuable. For example a few lists like 25 Best Libertarian Movies, 10 Best Antiwar Movies, 5 Best Dystopian Movies, 5 Best Libertarian Westerns. They would be shorter but there would actually be more information in them.

Yes I agree completely, this is the base level really - it will hopefully only get smaller. Maybe suggestions for categories? Those ones you mentioned are great so far. Might be an idea just to couple them, and not rate them in an order or 1 -> 25. Anyway:

Best Antiwar Movies

Best Dystopian Movies

Best Libertarian Westerns

Best Anti-State / Anti-Status Quo

Best Satire / Comedy

Best Conspiracy / Corruption

Best Individualist / Anti Conformist / Anti Collectivist

Best Business / Entrepreneur

Best Gangster

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Praetyre replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 2:10 AM

I would strongly recommend Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, which portrays a corrupt government with a media propaganda machine under it's control preferring to save public relational face than perform it's duty of providing security to it's citizens, and which sends a classic nanny state bureaucrat of a villain to attempt to manage a private school, and ends up greatly worsening the quality of education while more and more meddlesome regulations keep piling up. Only the private Order of the Phoenix is capable of combating criminals in  that day and age, and they do so in the face of government condemnation.

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Marko replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 2:23 AM

Yes I will try to think a little bit about it, see if I can offer any insight. But right now what buggs me a bit is what sort of a valuation are we looking for. I mean a movie can be very libertarian in its message and insight while being merely average as a work of cinema. On the other hand a movie can be fantastic as a work of cinema, but be libertarian only in part while the other part of its motiffs is taken by some neutral stuff. So which of the two is more worthy of being on a list of `Best Libertarian Movies`? The better movie or the more libertarian one?

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Nielsio replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 3:00 AM

This is a good idea guys.

 

I've created a page that everyone can use to put the list and continually improve it:

http://www.vforvoluntary.com/wiki/RecommendedMovies

 

I've set the privileges right now so that anyone can edit this page without having to register (I may change that after a while). Just double-click on the page and you can edit.

There is protection against double edits (two people at the same time), so don't need to worry about that; although it's still recommended to keep offline copies.

There are still advantages to registering (to see who edited what, coordination), but it's up to you.

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Captain Blood is such a great movie.

'Men do not change, they unmask themselves' - Germaine de Stael

 

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Hard Rain replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 3:48 AM

Praetyre:

I would strongly recommend Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, which portrays a corrupt government with a media propaganda machine under it's control preferring to save public relational face than perform it's duty of providing security to it's citizens, and which sends a classic nanny state bureaucrat of a villain to attempt to manage a private school, and ends up greatly worsening the quality of education while more and more meddlesome regulations keep piling up. Only the private Order of the Phoenix is capable of combating criminals in  that day and age, and they do so in the face of government condemnation.

Don't forget Harry Potter also has a commodity-based money system backed with 100% reserve banking and seemingly no government interference Stick out tongue

"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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Hard Rain:
Don't forget Harry Potter also have a commodity-based money system backed with 100% reserve banking and seemingly no government interference

That made me chuckle when I read about that. I'm still trying to deduce whether Gringotts is a central bank.

'Men do not change, they unmask themselves' - Germaine de Stael

 

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Hard Rain replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 3:55 AM

Laughing Man:

Hard Rain:
Don't forget Harry Potter also have a commodity-based money system backed with 100% reserve banking and seemingly no government interference

That made me chuckle when I read about that. I'm still trying to deduce whether Gringotts is a central bank.

Well, it seemed as if Gringotts was run independently by a minority of "good-with-money" goblins (which seems like a snipe at Jews, if you ask me).

Although we never hear of other banks it's possible that they can exist. Perhaps Gringotts performs to the market so well that it's a natural monopoly of sorts, if not simply the largest banking provider.

I don't think there would be a problem with people (or creatures) lending money or opening their own banks...

"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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Hard Rain:

Although we never hear of other banks it's possible that they can exist. Perhaps Gringotts performs to the market so well that it's a natural monopoly of sorts, if not simply the largest banking provider.

Natural monopolies? Bah! I refuse to accept such fairy tales in a story of witch and wizards!

 

'Men do not change, they unmask themselves' - Germaine de Stael

 

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Hard Rain replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 4:03 AM

Laughing Man:

Hard Rain:

Although we never hear of other banks it's possible that they can exist. Perhaps Gringotts performs to the market so well that it's a natural monopoly of sorts, if not simply the largest banking provider.

Natural monopolies? Bah! I refuse to accept such fairy tales in a story of witch and wizards!

Bleh, leave it to the good-with-money goblins, I say. Perhaps they have an untarnished record of trust spanning thousands of years! Stick out tongue

"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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Hard Rain:
Bleh, leave it to the good-with-money goblins, I say. Perhaps they have an untarnished record of trust spanning thousands of years!

Oh sure, lest we forget the Gringott's gold seizures of 1933!

'Men do not change, they unmask themselves' - Germaine de Stael

 

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Hard Rain replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 4:13 AM

Laughing Man:

Hard Rain:
Bleh, leave it to the good-with-money goblins, I say. Perhaps they have an untarnished record of trust spanning thousands of years!

Oh sure, lest we forget the Gringott's gold seizures of 1933!

This is because Harry Potter doesn't have a band of androgynous, benevolent elves romping around the countryside protecting everyone from evil Stick out tongue

"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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Hard Rain:
This is because Harry Potter doesn't have a band of androgynous, benevolent elves romping around the countryside protecting everyone from evil

Obviously Saron wouldn't of become a thread if there was a strong head of state in the white city. Bolster the executive! Allow for preemptive strikes!

'Men do not change, they unmask themselves' - Germaine de Stael

 

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Hard Rain replied on Sat, Dec 12 2009 4:23 AM

Laughing Man:

Hard Rain:
This is because Harry Potter doesn't have a band of androgynous, benevolent elves romping around the countryside protecting everyone from evil

Obviously Saron wouldn't of become a thread if there was a strong head of state in the white city. Bolster the executive! Allow for preemptive strikes!

The elves were benevolent enough to be non-interventionists. The less of a threat they appeared to Sauron the more he'd simply ignore them Stick out tongue

"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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