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Hayek vs Keynes video review, no mention of Mises?

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filc Posted: Sun, Jan 31 2010 7:22 PM

In the following video

kAaBwcBsAg.m4v

There was a discussion about that wonderful video Mr. Papola created. However when listening to their discussion I heard Rothbard mentioned, and ofcoarse Hayek, but no mention of Mises whatsoever?

Also in the PBS discussion at the end the pro market economist sounded like he did not fully grasp the Austrian Business Cycle Theory, and again no more references to Mises.

Not really an outcry but what gives? 

 

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I will scan their brains and report back with the results...

....unless anyone beats me to it

race !

 

Stick out tongue

Where there is no property there is no justice; a proposition as certain as any demonstration in Euclid

Fools! not to see that what they madly desire would be a calamity to them as no hands but their own could bring

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filc replied on Sun, Jan 31 2010 7:32 PM

nirgrahamUK:

I will scan their brains and report back with the results...

....unless anyone beats me to it

race !

 

Stick out tongue

pfft you got a leg up on me. I lent my brain scanner to my neighbor. Says he had his inlaws coming over.. 

*shrug*

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Anecdotally Austrians looks back to the historical greats as treasure troves of info to be studied, understood, and revered. NeoClassicals think that if it didn't happen in the last 10 years its old news and superseded. 

Where there is no property there is no justice; a proposition as certain as any demonstration in Euclid

Fools! not to see that what they madly desire would be a calamity to them as no hands but their own could bring

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filc replied on Sun, Jan 31 2010 7:36 PM

nirgrahamUK:

NeoClassicals think that if it didn't happen in the last 10 years its old news and superseded. 

In other words, whig theory?

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your compression algorithm is killer.

Where there is no property there is no justice; a proposition as certain as any demonstration in Euclid

Fools! not to see that what they madly desire would be a calamity to them as no hands but their own could bring

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Having listened to the first half, it's REALLY interesting to hear that Russ Roberts is Hayekian on micro issues, but that he's more mainstream on macro, and skeptical of Hayekian macro, and that it was the director Papola who really pushed for making the case for the ABCT in the video.  Also, Papola talks about doing the next project on the Broken Window Fallacy, which is really exciting.  And all this comes from self-teaching through podcasts and reading.  This guy is really cool.  If anything, Roberts might be holding him back; someone needs to hook Papola up with somebody like Garrison, Hulsmann, or de Soto.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Nielsio replied on Mon, Feb 1 2010 12:31 AM

I just put the interview on my Youtube channel, for easier watching:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_4_nEyf6mw

 

And there's also a link to the PBS item ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwsjPZgBOdU ).

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filc replied on Mon, Feb 1 2010 12:47 AM

I wonder how much this all cost, the video I mean. It would be fun of the Mises Institute did something like it.

And on another note, it would have been great if a Mises associate was up there debating the Keynesian goof.

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Esuric replied on Mon, Feb 1 2010 1:07 AM

I don't particularly like this interview. It's quite obvious he doesn't understand the complexities of the ABCT, and as such, he comes off as naive, which makes the ABCT seem naive/overly simplistic. This is something that I'm hearing more and more, namely that the ABCT is "too simple." Though it's probably the most complex explanation of trade cycles.

"If we wish to preserve a free society, it is essential that we recognize that the desirability of a particular object is not sufficient justification for the use of coercion."

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Nielsio replied on Mon, Feb 1 2010 8:16 AM

Esuric:

I don't particularly like this interview. It's quite obvious he doesn't understand the complexities of the ABCT, and as such, he comes off as naive, which makes the ABCT seem naive/overly simplistic. This is something that I'm hearing more and more, namely that the ABCT is "too simple." Though it's probably the most complex explanation of trade cycles.

The value of the interview is the story that Papola tells. If the interviewer isn't an advanced austro-libertarian doesn't really matter. It turns out that even Russ Roberts isn't fully onboard, yet they worked together to make it like this. And that's really the overall theme: getting principled and rigorous economics out in the mainstream.

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