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"Am considering other strategies, such as meditation."

 

Hey LeeO - I'm also big on meditation.  I'd definitely recommend it to people.

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@Spideynw, given that the Free State Project is in the USA wouldn't it be at best only a watered down version of the ideal? I feel like a more practical solution would be to (if possible) buy up a small piece of land from an existing State and attempt to create a new 100% sovereign community with all the ideals in place.

@DD5 good point, but I wasn't suggesting that these libertarians would believe that these politicians could become immune to special interests. By what I said there I meant that we would continually expose exactly how they appeal to special interests in order to keep people aware of the situation and frustration high. Considering most people don't realize just how much special interests control things it couldn't hurt to keep people aware of it. It's not too far from what the Mises dailies are already doing, constantly describing todays events from the perspective of the Austrian school. 

Edit: Also, thanks for the big welcome Spideynw! :)

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Spideynw replied on Wed, Oct 13 2010 1:33 PM

freeradicals:

@Spideynw, given that the Free State Project is in the USA wouldn't it be at best only a watered down version of the ideal? I feel like a more practical solution would be to (if possible) buy up a small piece of land from an existing State and attempt to create a new 100% sovereign community with all the ideals in place.

I don't think it would be a watered down version.  I don't think it would take more than 3% of the population disobeying tax laws to end taxation.  The U.S. government has the highest incarceration rates in the world, at only about 1% of the population.  And those are generally the poorest of the population.  Imagine them trying to incarcerate three times that amount, who are educated about law and closer to middle class.  I don't think they could do it.  It would also be a massive public relations issue.  Once the government decides those 3% are exempt from taxes, why would anyone else continue paying?  People would soon see the amount of power they have, by just not obeying the government.  I think a radical change in thinking would occur almost over night.

At most, I think only 5% of the adult population would need to stop cooperating to have real change.

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About 3% resisting and it's all over:

Yes, that may be true. The big challenge is going to be finding those first brave souls who will certainly go through the worst kinds of hell. Think of the ugliest prison book or movie you have seen or read, and it will be at least like that.

Because the powers that be will realize quite clearly that the game is being played for all the marbles, and will pull out all the stops.

Probably the only ones willing to step forward will be those that feel they have nothing to lose. As Bob Dylan defined it, "When you ain't got nothing, you got nothing to lose."

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Spideynw replied on Wed, Oct 13 2010 2:19 PM

Seems a lot easier than trying to get 51% of voters to come out and vote for enough people in government to pass legislation making taxation illegal...

At most, I think only 5% of the adult population would need to stop cooperating to have real change.

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true dat

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