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Massachusetts man resists property tax, is evicted by the state, blames international banksters

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Freedom4Me73986 Posted: Fri, Jul 15 2011 4:41 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrTXXUB0xak

This guy is a hero. I don't agree with his views on Jews though. Real Jews are libertarian and anti-statist in nature. He should have said "Khazar banksters" because that's what they really are.

But he needs to move to NH to avoid the tax tyranny of Mass.

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Clayton replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 5:05 PM

NH doesn't have propert taxes??!?

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NH has property taxes, yes.

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Clayton replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 5:11 PM

What is wrong with these FSP people?? Do they really think the state of NH will not throw their ass in jail if they don't pay their property taxes??

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NH doesn't have propert taxes??!?

It does, but NH is much better tax-wise than Mass.

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Fireworks are legal there too. That's like the only reason to go there other than for vacation lol.

I don't think I'd ever move to NH. Not enough people.

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I don't think I'd ever move to NH. Not enough people.

If enough liberty-minded people move, there will be.

Have you ever been to NH? The southern part of the state is full of people (mostly ex-Massachusetts residents who are somewhat statist but still). The largest city (Manchester) has over 100,000 people.

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Chyd3nius replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 5:29 PM

What is wrong with these FSP people?? Do they really think the state of NH will not throw their ass in jail if they don't pay their property taxes??

I'm very suspicious about FSP "an-caps" who just roll on smoking pot and trying to do any "civil disobedience" and calling police to watch when they are doing their "stuff"... It just puts FSP to the bad light. Just live by NH laws and don't make FSP to look like total jerks, that's my opinion. I hope that they realize what they are doing.

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I live in Massachusetts. I've been there plenty of times. I was up at Winnepesaki a few weeks ago.

My town alone has nearly 100,000 people. Everyone I know lives here, and I'm not much of an activist, so I doubt I'd ever move there for anything liberty-oriented. Plus it's nice to live in a varied environment. I think I'd get bored if I was surrounded by like-minded people 24/7.

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I'm very suspicious about FSP "an-caps" who just roll on smoking pot and trying to do any "civil disobedience" and calling police to watch when they are doing their "stuff"... It just puts FSP to the bad light. Just live by NH laws and don't make FSP to look like total jerks, that's my opinion. I hope that they realize what they are doing.

What? You think the civ-dis of the Keeniacs is part of some pro-state conspiracy to discredit the liberty movement?

The fact is, the civ-dis tactics are meant to drain the state and/or remove laws for victimless crimes. Soon enough, Keene residents will get sick of the Keeniacs going to jail and causing the town to spend all sorts of unnecessary fees to keep them locked in cages, so they'll demand that the laws be removed. This will lead to lower taxes over all since there will be way less people going to jail then before and will also lead to cuts in police spending. It also draws attention to the stupidity of having laws against victimless crimes to begin with.

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I think I'd get bored if I was surrounded by like-minded people 24/7.

You won't, trust me. You'll be surprised as to how many pro-liberty people are in NH. Every one of them knows the Mises Institute. NH still has a lot of statists and "progressives" as well, but they're not nearly as active as libertarians and anarcho-capitalists. I can't think of a single reason why living in Mass would be better than living in NH. And NH is NOT boring. There's tons of stuff to do (lakes, mountains, seacoast, agorism, tax-free shopping) you just have to be creative and know where to look for it. And Boston is only an hour away by car from Manchester (an hour from Portsmouth, an hour an a half from Concord, two hours from Laconia, around two hours from Keene) so it's not totally in the middle-of-nowhere.

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Well that's the problem. I said I'd probably get bored if I was surrounded by like-minded people. If there are a bunch of pro-liberty people, I don't know if I'd actually enjoy it. This is assuming that liberty activism is a large part of daily life, of course.

Like I said, everyone I know is around where I live, and I enjoy being around people who don't necessarily agree with my ideals. It sort of keeps one from stagnating or even becoming too dogmatic.

And regarding the lakes and mountains and stuff, I go to Maine for that :P

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Clayton replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 6:14 PM

You think the civ-dis of the Keeniacs is part of some pro-state conspiracy to discredit the liberty movement?

Wouldn't be the first time. Or the second or third or who knows how many times. Deployment of agents provocateur to discredit embryonic reformist groups is SOP for every government.

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Well that's the problem. I said I'd probably get bored if I was surrounded by like-minded people. If there are a bunch of pro-liberty people, I don't know if I'd actually enjoy it. This is assuming that liberty activism is a large part of daily life, of course.

Like I said, everyone I know is around where I live, and I enjoy being around people who don't necessarily agree with my ideals. It sort of keeps one from stagnating or even becoming too dogmatic.

And regarding the lakes and mountains and stuff, I go to Maine for that :P

Ever been to Laconia or Lebanon/Grafton, NH? The mountains and lakes in Maine have nothing on NH, trust me. Plus there is a huge (well, as huge as outside-the-box movements get) number of agorists in Grafton who are practicing free market ideals. They are not academics but actual believers in the free market who do what they believe instead of just writing about it in journals and on the internet.

A bit off-topic, but I find that the problem with the liberty movement in general is how it's mostly talk with little activity. We can spend all day on this site discussing ways to achieve a stateless free market but how many of us will participate in one? That's why I like the free staters. They talk a lot and, yes, a good amount of what they do doesn't bring us much closer to a freer society I'll admit, but they want to participate in an unregulated, tax-free marketplace and are. But that's another thread.

 

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Clayton replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 8:34 PM

A bit off-topic, but I find that the problem with the liberty movement in general is how it's mostly talk with little activity.

Actually, the activity that really matters starts in your mind. Simply saying "I don't accept the legitimacy of State authority any longer" is all that is necessary. I've heard Hulsmann call this "originary secession"... I like that term. From there on, everything you do in life is calculated on the basis of prudence vis-a-vis the diktats of the State and its enforcers. If anybody wants to move to NH, more power to them. However, the moral and intellectual revolution we need must necessarily come from a distributed, centerless and spontaneous movement. No freedom movement can stand for long in the face of the determined efforts of the State to wipe it out. But the one freedom movement that cannot be stopped by the State or any other force is that which emerges from the spontaneous efforts of individuals to achieve self-actualization. While I am pretty pessimistic about the short-run prospects of personal liberty, in the long run, I believe the State qua State is doomed. One day, our descendants will look back on this era and shake their heads in confusion and disbelief.

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However, the moral and intellectual revolution we need must necessarily come from a distributed, centerless and spontaneous movement. No freedom movement can stand for long in the face of the determined efforts of the State to wipe it out. But the one freedom movement that cannot be stopped by the State or any other force is that which emerges from the spontaneous efforts of individuals to achieve self-actualization. While I am pretty pessimistic about the short-run prospects of personal liberty, in the long run, I believe the State qua State is doomed. One day, our descendants will look back on this era and shake their heads in confusion and disbelief.

Ron Paul's measly showing in the 2008 pres. election shows how weak a liberty movement is when it's scattered. A decentralized liberty movement just won't work. Since there are very few libertarians and anarcho-capitalists in the world (and very few of those libs and an-caps who are honestly active and not just keyboard activists and/or intellectuals/talking-heads). If we got enough an-caps and libs together in one place (NH) there is a chance that something liberty-oriented will become of it. And it already has. So far, over 50 free staters have been elected into the NH state house.  Not that I believe any gov. is legit but how many other places in America have OVER 50 FREAKIN LIBERTARIANS in office?! Sure it doesnt necessarily mean NH is any closer to anarchy but it's a start (as having Ron Paul for pres. would be a start). And there's Porcfest every year and agorism in the Grafton area. There's lots of stuff going down in NH that doesn't go down anywhere else. Give it a try and move here.

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Clayton replied on Fri, Jul 15 2011 9:05 PM

@Freedom4: No, you don't get it. Real progress towards liberty will not be the result of conscious deliberation on the part of any group of individuals. It emerges only as an unintended by-product of other social changes. The status quo reflects something about the nature and attitudes of the public and cannot be changed at will, even by the State. This is at once an obstacle to short-run progress but is also the long-run guarantee of progress. The State cannot stop the slow progression of the status quo towards greater and ever greater individual liberty for the same reason that we cannot bring about a free society overnight.

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Freedom4Me73986:
Ever been to Laconia or Lebanon/Grafton, NH? The mountains and lakes in Maine have nothing on NH, trust me. Plus there is a huge (well, as huge as outside-the-box movements get) number of agorists in Grafton who are practicing free market ideals. They are not academics but actual believers in the free market who do what they believe instead of just writing about it in journals and on the internet.

I said a few posts ago that I was in the Winnipesaukee area (Laconia exactly, actually) a few weeks ago. I've been going to NH since I was a kid. I prefer Maine.

And you're still not understanding me. I don't find the prospect of being surrounded by like-minded people every day very appealing, so I don't know why you keep referencing pro-liberty activists or agorists or whatever.

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@Freedom4: No, you don't get it. Real progress towards liberty will not be the result of conscious deliberation on the part of any group of individuals. It emerges only as an unintended by-product of other social changes. The status quo reflects something about the nature and attitudes of the public and cannot be changed at will, even by the State. This is at once an obstacle to short-run progress but is also the long-run guarantee of progress. The State cannot stop the slow progression of the status quo towards greater and ever greater individual liberty for the same reason that we cannot bring about a free society overnight.

I beg to differ. The free staters who are in NH as of right now (there's only 923 here, at least according to the website counter) have done a lot to advance liberty. There are 50+ free staters in the NH house and they're doing things like privatizing the education system, getting rid of mandated kindergarten, getting rid of useless laws which are just more excuses for the state to cage and fine people, cutting gov. spending and a lot more. In 10 years I'm sure NH will be dominated with free staters and will be much, much freer than anywhere else in America in terms of less state control and freer enterprise. I already mentioned the Grafton free market/agorism. Everyone interested in free markets should do more research on it.
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Freedom4Me73986:
Ever been to Laconia or Lebanon/Grafton, NH? The mountains and lakes in Maine have nothing on NH, trust me. Plus there is a huge (well, as huge as outside-the-box movements get) number of agorists in Grafton who are practicing free market ideals. They are not academics but actual believers in the free market who do what they believe instead of just writing about it in journals and on the internet.

I said a few posts ago that I was in the Winnipesaukee area (Laconia exactly, actually) a few weeks ago. I've been going to NH since I was a kid. I prefer Maine.

And you're still not understanding me. I don't find the prospect of being surrounded by like-minded people every day very appealing, so I don't know why you keep referencing pro-liberty activists or agorists or whatever.

OK. And I won't pressure you to move if that's the case. But I still think our time as liberty-minded individuals would be much better spent contributing to the liberty movement in NH instead of waiting around for the state to go belly-up or a liberty movement to spark in your area. 

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Getting back to my original post topic. Here is the vid:

Listen to this guy. Wow.

 

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