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*** November 2011 low content thread ***

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Bert replied on Sat, Nov 5 2011 1:58 AM

I've noticed the amount of ads for careers in network security have gone up, and in whatever ads I see it's always for a government job.  Especially since Anonymous started getting more popular.

It's just a huge waste of resources, especially looking for something like terrorist regarded messages or information posted on some networking status update (with all the political shit and angst posted on FB I think it's futile to filter out the commentary, discussion, and bitching with actual terrorist intent, and how much of that is actually being passed through a network that said terrorists would obviously know is being tapped).  I think you'd have a better chance of figuring out a local crime through these networks than anything larger (I remember in high school it seems one of my friend's had something put against him by the school in regards to something he had said in a Myspace comment/message - whatever it was confirmed their allegations against him, but it was so stupid I can't even remember what the situation was, just enough that they were able to tap into his Myspace to find something out that they thought he did).

I had always been impressed by the fact that there are a surprising number of individuals who never use their minds if they can avoid it, and an equal number who do use their minds, but in an amazingly stupid way. - Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols
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You bring up a really good point, Clayton. The IBMs are an extension of the pre-school to college schooling system, where pre-school is training elementary school, which is training for middle school, which is training high school, which is training for college, which is training for IBM, Exxon Mobil, Goldman Sachs, Ernst & Young, General Electric, AT&T, McKesson, Cargill, and government. I think the obviousness of the latter part are the corporate-university partnerships.

Also, all those PhDs in the tech industry are basically there to patent stuff to stiffle the start ups.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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Clayton replied on Sat, Nov 5 2011 2:15 AM

Also, all those PhDs in the tech industry are basically there to patent stuff to stiffle the start ups.

Abso-freakin-lutely. As I said, I work for one of the largest firms... patents are conscientiously sought by corporate (they pay out a fixed reward for any patent, doesn't matter what it is) for defensive legal purposes (suits from other corporations) but there is no doubt that they would not hesitate to deploy their portfolio of patents against an upstart competitor if it started eating into their profit margins. And these patents basically cover everything that's not nailed down.

You can't get within 100 miles of an original idea not because all the good ideas were already thought up by PhDs employed by corporations but because all the big ideas that contain every possible good idea have been written out by PhDs and then patented. Go do patent searches on Google... you'll see things like "Method and Apparatus for high-speed communication between a central processing unit and memory." Really. So these guys have patented the very idea of high-speed communication between a CPU and memory as if all the other designs including CPU and memory had never thought of, perhaps, trying to make the communication channel between the CPU and memory... high-speed! There are a zillion such patents of varying levels of detail and scope.

I recently had an interesting idea I thought of submitting to the company for the patent payout but then I searched around the Internet and found that there are patented designs out there that are different (and inferior) to my idea but close enough and broadly worded enough that there's little point in wasting the time having them run a patent search only to be told no, they won't patent it. And that's not to mention that there's no point in someone like me with a meager BS from a small, affordable university without all the big, fancy name-recognition attempting to go toe-to-toe with the Stanford/Cornell/MIT/UC Berkeley PhDs that have already decided, in their infinite wisdom, to use a different design.

And that would be the key thing - if I had the "clout" to move the organization and persuade people that my approach is superior to the current design which is also good but not nearly as good as it could be, then they might fight for the patent and get prepared to defend against any counter-patent claims. But failing that, the status quo remains as it is and the wobbly opinions of a mundane, low-level engineer could never hope to challenge it.

*sigh

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IP is protectionism at its best because its advocates want to control ideas (i.e. theft of ideas), not merely actions (trade of goods), and the masses who grow up in the shooling system think it is necessary, otherwise we'd all be living in the stone age.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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Clayton replied on Sat, Nov 5 2011 4:34 PM

Global Village Construction Set

Actually sounds kind of cool on first brush. But when you think about it slightly more deeply, you realize that it's a farce. The market economy is the open-source "village construction set." Look at this 1930 John Deere Spoker D tractor:

It's a work of art. It was built from the finest components available at the time. While you could not purchase one if you were a broke dirt-farmer, you didn't have to be JP Morgan to afford... small, middle-class farmer-owners were the target market.

Now compare that to these "open-source" designs. They're junk. They're built from scrap components and they look ugly, unimaginative and barely usable.

I'm curious if there's a connection with these guys and the Venus Project. How did he start doing this after he was broke? Notice his Stalin-esque fashion sense. Notice his faux-Zen gravitas manner of speaking like VP's Jacques Fresco or Zeitgeist's Peter Joseph.

It is true that starting a small farm from scratch is almost unaffordable. A very small, modest tractor with a PTO and hydraulics will cost you well over $20K today. Very few people who might be interested in starting and operating a farm could save up this much money. They can go into debt (yuck) but this just reduces the profitability of the farm. It could be the case that modern farming is just so much more efficient at large scales that small-scale farming no longer makes economic sense so there's no genuine market demand for affordable, small-scale farm implements. But I doubt this is the case. Rather, I suspect our central bank's steady devaluation of the dollar and the fake centralizing effects this has on all industries, including agriculture.

Rather than trying to reinvent society from the ground up, why not end the foolish and unjust laws that have given rise to central banking, intellectual property, corporatism, protectionism, and so on. Unleash the market and you won't have to try to reinvent society with machines built from scrapyard junk, you will see affordable, practical devices that meet the demands of small-scale producers entering the market, devices whose engineering and design will make them a work of art in their own right, not the ugly and gangly imitations these GVCS people are building.

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Do they actually plan on making a business of it? If not, then they are developing the GVCS to satisfy their own felt uneasiness, not that of others.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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Clayton replied on Sat, Nov 5 2011 8:12 PM

Signs of aging halted in the lab. Definitely an exciting time to be alive. The inciters of class envy are going to have a field day with these new medical technologies... just look at that new movie In Time.

We are on the verge of a technological revolution in medicine that will dwarf all the children of the Industrial Revolution to date - trains, textile machines, internal combustion engines, electricity, telegraphy, telephones, radio, television, satellites, and the Internet combined. Take a look:

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Farm subsidies turned all the farm machine firms into state funded monsters.  We all know what the state does to costs, right?  I agree with you that "starting over" doesn't make any sense, but when you decentralize, decentralization tends to occur!  I imagine the "village" as a social unit will make a comeback in a more decentralized future.

"What Stirner says is a word, a thought, a concept; what he means is no word, no thought, no concept. What he says is not what is meant, and what he means is unsayable." - Max Stirner, Stirner's Critics
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I felt obliged to share this with everyone.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w2xXOQY-NY

'' The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.'' Stephen Hawking

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What?!

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Malachi replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 2:35 PM
That article is awesome. It is basically 40% ron paul quotes, but has a hot female neocon as headliner so people from the left and the right will read it.
Keep the faith, Strannix. -Casey Ryback, Under Siege (Steven Seagal)
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a) this should be posted here.

b) it's a year old, used to promote his krugman debate campaign, which he apparently doesn't even care enough about to remove any of the forest of spam on the campaign page.

 

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Here's the Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace interview they're referencing (from today):

 

 

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Groucho replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 3:56 PM

Strangely hilarious.

I'm glad to see Bob Murphy has a good sense of humor.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup. -H.L. Mencken
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Clayton replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 4:47 PM

I don't care what you say, Ron Paul is definitely more polished and definitely handling the "tough" questions much more adeptly than he did in 2008. He projects an air of confidence in himself and his ideas that he did not project as well in 2008. Note that there's a difference between being confident and projecting confidence. I think the Establishment must be s***ting themselves at this point. Cain is a distraction. His job is to suck up all the oxygen until the last minute so Republicans will just assume it's a "Perry vs. Romney" vote.

I really don't understand why the news anchors keep trying to make him firmly disavow a 3rd-party run. What difference does it make? If he loses the Republican nomination and chooses to run 3rd-party, what are they going to do, accuse him of flip-flopping?? I really don't think the voters will care that he said he wasn't going to run 3rd party.

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Eric080 replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 7:57 PM

For any fans of Libertarian Dubstep:

 

 

Featuring Jeff Riggenbach cool

"And it may be said with strict accuracy, that the taste a man may show for absolute government bears an exact ratio to the contempt he may profess for his countrymen." - de Tocqueville
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a "Perry vs. Romney" vote.

It doesn't appear so: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2012/president/us/republican_presidential_nomination-1452.html

I find it quite interesting that Paul's vote is so constant (around 9%ish). It seems like he simply has a core of supporters behind him which is unshakeable. If he is able to increase this by maybe 5%, he has a huge potential to win. I think Santorum, Hunstman, and Bachmann simply need to quit now.

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For any fans of Libertarian Dubstep

A tad bit too oriental for me.

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Clayton replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 9:36 PM

@Eric: Nice! Never heard of libertarian dubstep before... checking it out now...

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Clayton replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 11:08 PM

Crap, now I've got this damn Porter Robinson song on loop! Who would ever have thought of Rothbard's words being turned into an electro mix. I like whatever he did to Riggenbach's voice to give it that pissed-off sound!

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Surprise:

Ron Paul disqualified from Bill O'Reilly Straw Poll 11-7-11

 

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Heather replied on Thu, Nov 10 2011 12:45 AM

I laughed out loud when I read the top comments for this video

 

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Bert replied on Thu, Nov 10 2011 12:22 PM

A blog I just made on vegetarianism/veganism, health, and nutrition.  Posting scholarly studies/articles on the benefits of a veg diet and anything else (documentaries, etc.)

I had always been impressed by the fact that there are a surprising number of individuals who never use their minds if they can avoid it, and an equal number who do use their minds, but in an amazingly stupid way. - Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols
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Heather Malin:
I laughed out loud when I read the top comments for this video

It's true.  It's the same thing they do in every straw poll.  Just like I was saying here.  They want to paint actually bothering to vote in straw polls as some kind of "fix".  O'dumbass keeps saying "they slammed the polls"...

Even when he describes what that is supposed to mean it still sounds like he's saying that people were encouraged to go vote.  In fact, that's exactly what he's saying.  He said so himself.  He's saying a group of individuals went around online and elsewhere and told people to vote for a certain candidate.  He's saying people were canvassing supporters to participate and influence a (mock) election by casting a vote.  Some people might even say "campaigning" took place.
 
Call me naive, but I kind of thought that's what elections were all about.  He wants to claim results are "skewed" because people who supported a certain candidate made it a point to go cast their vote, and told their friends and neighbors to do the same.  Again, is that what happened in 2008?  Obama didn't really win the election, he just "severely skewed the results" because his people were told to flood the polls?

They really will try anything to bring this man down.  And just as I was saying here, Justin T. P. Quinn notes in this excellent piece (I mean it...it's excellent.  Read it.):

"[Ron Paul's supportors] are the paragon of what the ideal political activist would be.  They are arguably the only true grassroots activists in existence right now. They don't wait for direction or leadership from Ron Paul himself.  Rather, inspired by Paul's ideals, they act on their own. Nothing else in history comes close to what they've accomplished."

And consistantly making Paul a landslide winner in virtually every straw vote and online poll is just one example of those actions they take.  And the people who enjoy the status quo are desperately doing anything they can to paint him and his supporters negatively.  We really are winning something here.

 

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If you haven't seen this webpage before, you should have a look.  It's the best page in the universe (it says so).  But this recent entry I thought was quite appropriate

A Message to Cops

 

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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 12:14 AM

hmm? I see. You were reading different top comments from when I saw them earlier, James.

Nevertheless, I agree with you on this one. These guys are getting more and more pathetic. Tell me they don't actually think we can't figure out what's O'Really going on?

My "fanatical" support of Ron Paul only equally increases with their ever desperate attempts to black him out. 

 

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Oh man Chris Matthews is on Jay Leno right now. This guy is a complete moron.

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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 12:49 AM

Throw down another $20.12 for this MoneyBomb is all I ask. Remember, they don't want you to. 

And Enjoy :)

 

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DanielMuff replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 12:58 AM

Where is your avatar from?

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 1:16 AM

The Muffinburglar is asking me where mine is from? ;)

I stumbled onto it somewhere and thought it kinda looked like me

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I like it cuz it reminds me of her.

 

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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 1:30 AM

Porco Rosso:

Oh man Chris Matthews is on Jay Leno right now. This guy is a complete moron.

You actually watch the interviews?..

I do when I want to get a good snooze

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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 2:17 AM

John James:

I like it cuz it reminds me of her.

She seems to be very high in demand

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Heather Malin:

The Muffinburglar is asking me where mine is from? ;)

I stumbled onto it somewhere and thought it kinda looked like me

I asked because she's what I would image to be a woman version of Murray "the Happy Libertarian" Rothbard.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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Hard Rain replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 11:01 AM
"I don't believe in ghosts, sermons, or stories about money" - Rooster Cogburn, True Grit.
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Heather replied on Fri, Nov 11 2011 2:01 PM

Daniel Muffinburg:

Heather Malin:

The Muffinburglar is asking me where mine is from? ;)

I stumbled onto it somewhere and thought it kinda looked like me

I asked because she's what I would image to be a woman version of Murray "the Happy Libertarian" Rothbard.

cool

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