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Ethical Philosophy Quiz

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Rorschach Posted: Mon, May 28 2012 1:51 PM

Ethical Philosophy Quiz

This 12-question quiz is supposed to tell you which philosopher or school of philosophers you are most compatible with in terms of your concept of morality.

Results:

  1. Immanuel Kant
  2. Prescriptivism
  3. Ayn Rand
  4. John Stuart Mill
  5. Jean-Paul Sartre
  6. Baruch Spinoza
  7. Jeremy Bentham
  8. Stoics
  9. Epicureans
  10. Aristotle
  11. Friedrich Nietzsche
  12. Thomas Aquinas
  13. William of Ockham
  14. Plato
  15. David Hume
  16. St. Augustine
  17. Thomas Hobbes
  18. Nel Noddings
  19. Cynics

I must not have an extremely high compatibility with any of these people/schools, because I don't completely agree with Kant, although I would guess Kant and Ayn Rand would be high up for most libertarians.  I wonder if all of these people have truly elaborated enough on ethics to give a complete view of what they believe.  I'm not very familiar with Bentham, Ockham or Noddings, and I don't know what Hume or Hobbes believed with regard to morality.

Feel free to post your own results.  I'm curious to see if the results are similar amongst people here.

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My Buddy replied on Mon, May 28 2012 2:06 PM
  1. Jean-Paul Sartre
  2. Ayn Rand
  3. Baruch Spinoza
  4. Friedrich Nietzsche
  5. Jean-Paul Sartre
  6. Immanuel Kant
  7. Thomas Aquinas
  8. David Hume
  9. Stoics
  10. Epicureans
  11. Thomas Hobbes
  12. Aristotle
  13. Prescriptivism
  14. Cynics
  15. Jeremy Bentham
  16. St. Augustine
  17. William of Ockham
  18. Plato
  19. Nel Noddings

 

I was 100% on with Sartre, which is kinda funny.

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Neodoxy replied on Mon, May 28 2012 2:07 PM

 

About what I'd expect:

 

1. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (100 %)

2. Ayn Rand (99 %)

3. David Hume (96 %)

4. Thomas Hobbes (94 %)

5. Jean-Paul Sartre (91 %)

6. Stoics (74 %)

7. Cynics (62 %)

8. Baruch (later known as Benedictus)Spinoza (62 %)

9. Plato (50 %)

10. Aristotle (47 %)

11. Epicureans (44 %)

12. Jeremy Bentham (38 %)

13. John Stuart Mill (34 %)

14. Immanuel Kant (33 %)

15. St. Augustine (33 %)

16. Thomas Aquinas (30 %)

17. Prescriptivism (25 %)

18. Nel Noddings (11 %)

19. William of Ockham (7 %)

At last those coming came and they never looked back With blinding stars in their eyes but all they saw was black...
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Nielsio replied on Mon, May 28 2012 2:10 PM

 

1. David Hume (100%)  
2. Jean-Paul Sartre (90%)  
3. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (85%)  
4. Thomas Hobbes (81%)  
5. Cynics (76%)  
6. Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (73%)  
7. Stoics (73%)  
8. Thomas Aquinas (64%)  
9. Ayn Rand (60%)  
10. Nel Noddings (59%)  
11. Aristotle (45%)  
12. Plato (43%)  
13. Immanuel Kant (40%)  
14. John Stuart Mill (39%)  
15. Jeremy Bentham (34%)  
16. St. Augustine (31%)  
17. Epicureans (26%)  
18. Prescriptivism (25%)  
19. William of Ockham (14%)
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Here are my results:
1. Ayn Rand (100 %)
2. John Stuart Mill (75 %)
3. Thomas Aquinas (61 %)
4. Aristotle (61 %)
5. Immanuel Kant (61 %)
6. David Hume (59 %)
7. Jean-Paul Sartre (59 %)
8. Stoics (59 %)
9. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (55 %)
10. St. Augustine (54 %)
11. Epicureans (54 %)
12. Cynics (51 %)
13. Jeremy Bentham (50 %)
14. Plato (50 %)
15. Thomas Hobbes (43 %)
16. Prescriptivism (39 %)
17. Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (37 %)
18. William of Ockham (27 %)
19. Nel Noddings (14 %)

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gotlucky replied on Mon, May 28 2012 3:07 PM

1. Epicureans  (100 %)  
2. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche  (90 %)  
3. Jean-Paul Sartre  (86 %)  
4. Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza  (85 %)  
5. Immanuel Kant  (82 %)  
6. John Stuart Mill  (78 %)  
7. David Hume  (78 %)  
8. Prescriptivism  (75 %)  
9. Thomas Hobbes  (72 %)  
10. Ayn Rand  (72 %)  
11. Stoics  (68 %)  
12. Aristotle  (58 %)  
13. Thomas Aquinas  (50 %)  
14. Nel Noddings  (46 %)  
15. Jeremy Bentham  (40 %)  
16. William of Ockham  (37 %)  
17. Plato  (36 %)  
18. Cynics  (32 %)  
19. St. Augustine  (30 %)  
 

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I'm somewhat surprised at these results as I'm not a utilitarian.

 

1.  John Stuart Mill (100%)        MORE
2.  Epicureans (90%)        MORE
3.  Immanuel Kant (87%)        MORE
4.  Jeremy Bentham (87%)        MORE
5.  Ayn Rand (79%)        MORE
6.  St. Augustine (78%)        MORE
7.  Plato (75%)        MORE
8.  Thomas Aquinas (73%)        MORE
9.  Prescriptivism (68%)        MORE
10.  Aristotle (64%)        MORE
11.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (62%)        MORE
12.  Jean-Paul Sartre (60%)        MORE
13.  William of Ockham (46%)        MORE
14.  Stoics (43%)        MORE
15.  Thomas Hobbes (38%)        MORE
16.  David Hume (33%)        MORE
17.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (33%)        MORE
18.  Cynics (23%)        MORE
19.  Nel Noddings (18%)        MORE

 

The atoms tell the atoms so, for I never was or will but atoms forevermore be.

Yours sincerely,

Physiocrat

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1.  Immanuel Kant (100%)        MORE
2.  Ayn Rand (98%)        MORE
3.  John Stuart Mill (94%)        MORE
4.  Prescriptivism (86%)        MORE
5.  Jeremy Bentham (80%)        MORE
6.  Cynics (66%)        MORE
7.  Epicureans (66%)        MORE
8.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (60%)        MORE
9.  Jean-Paul Sartre (60%)        MORE
10.  Aristotle (54%)        MORE
11.  Nel Noddings (54%)        MORE
12.  Thomas Hobbes (52%)        MORE
13.  David Hume (52%)        MORE
14.  Thomas Aquinas (51%)        MORE
15.  William of Ockham (47%)        MORE
16.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (44%)        MORE
17.  Plato (39%)        MORE
18.  Stoics (39%)        MORE
19.  St. Augustine (38%)        MORE
 

 

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1.  Jean-Paul Sartre (100%)        MORE
2.  Thomas Hobbes (88%)        MORE
3.  David Hume (88%)        MORE
4.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (88%)        MORE
5.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (85%)        MORE
6.  Immanuel Kant (81%)        MORE
7.  John Stuart Mill (77%)        MORE
8.  Prescriptivism (77%)        MORE
9.  Stoics (70%)        MORE
10.  Ayn Rand (68%)        MORE
11.  Epicureans (64%)        MORE
12.  Nel Noddings (64%)        MORE
13.  Jeremy Bentham (61%)        MORE
14.  Cynics (57%)        MORE
15.  Aristotle (48%)        MORE
16.  Thomas Aquinas (29%)        MORE
17.  St. Augustine (25%)        MORE
18.  William of Ockham (25%)        MORE
19.  Plato (11%)        MORE

At least I have Sartre only once on the list. Anyway, surprised (by Hobbes as well).

 

The Voluntaryist Reader - read, comment, post your own.
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Mtn Dew replied on Tue, May 29 2012 8:49 AM

 

 

http://selectsmart.com/plus/fade.jpg

1. 

St. Augustine (100%)

  

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2. 

Thomas Aquinas(95%)

  

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3. 

Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (93%)

  

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4. 

Immanuel Kant (72%)

  

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5. 

Stoics (68%)

  

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6. 

Ayn Rand (64%)

  

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7. 

William of Ockham(63%)

  

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8. 

Plato (60%)

  

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9. 

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (60%)

  

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10. 

Aristotle (59%)

  

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11. 

Jeremy Bentham(53%)

  

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12. 

John Stuart Mill (51%)

  

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13. 

Prescriptivism (48%)

  

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14. 

Epicureans (45%)

  

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15. 

Jean-Paul Sartre(41%)

  

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16. 

Cynics (36%)

  

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17. 

David Hume (36%)

  

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18. 

Nel Noddings (21%)

  

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19. 

Thomas Hobbes(16%)

  

 

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1.  Aristotle (100%)        MORE
2.  Thomas Aquinas (99%)        MORE
3.  Ayn Rand (84%)        MORE
4.  John Stuart Mill (82%)        MORE
5.  Jeremy Bentham (75%)        MORE
6.  Cynics (71%)        MORE
7.  Epicureans (71%)        MORE
8.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (68%)        MORE
9.  Jean-Paul Sartre (68%)        MORE
10.  Thomas Hobbes (64%)        MORE
11.  St. Augustine (62%)        MORE
12.  William of Ockham (62%)        MORE
13.  Plato (58%)        MORE
14.  David Hume (58%)        MORE
15.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (57%)        MORE
16.  Immanuel Kant (50%)        MORE
17.  Nel Noddings (49%)        MORE
18.  Stoics (42%)        MORE
19.  Prescriptivism (33%)        MORE

 

they said we would have an unfair fun advantage

"enough about human rights. what about whale rights?" -moondog
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  1.  Ayn Rand (100%)        MORE
2.  Jean-Paul Sartre (95%)        MORE
3.  John Stuart Mill (94%)        MORE
4.  Aristotle (76%)        MORE
5.  Thomas Aquinas (74%)        MORE
6.  Jeremy Bentham (74%)        MORE
7.  Thomas Hobbes (66%)        MORE
8.  David Hume (66%)        MORE
9.  Cynics (60%)        MORE
10.  Epicureans (60%)        MORE
11.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (54%)        MORE
12.  Immanuel Kant (49%)        MORE
13.  Plato (48%)        MORE
14.  Stoics (46%)        MORE
15.  Nel Noddings (42%)        MORE
16.  St. Augustine (36%)        MORE
17.  Prescriptivism (29%)        MORE
18.  William of Ockham (27%)        MORE
19.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (25%)

 

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Wheylous replied on Tue, May 29 2012 10:19 AM

 

1.  Immanuel Kant (100%)       
2.  Ayn Rand (70%)       
3.  Jean-Paul Sartre (65%)       
4.  Stoics (63%)        MORE
5.  John Stuart Mill (59%)        MORE
6.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (54%)        MORE
7.  Prescriptivism (50%)        MORE
8.  Jeremy Bentham (45%)        MORE
9.  David Hume (44%)        MORE
10.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (44%)        MORE
11.  Thomas Aquinas (40%)        MORE
12.  Epicureans (40%)        MORE
13.  Nel Noddings (40%)        MORE
14.  Aristotle (37%)        MORE
15.  Thomas Hobbes (31%)        MORE
16.  William of Ockham (26%)        MORE
17.  Cynics (25%)        MORE
18.  Plato (22%)        MORE
19.  St. Augustine (19%)        MORE

 

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100% Nietzsche

93% Sartre

88% Hobbes

77% Hume

after that everything drops off by 30%

Surprisingly what I would expect, even percentage-wise, given the choices - as these Cosmo quizes are fun but a bit superficial

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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Clayton replied on Tue, May 29 2012 11:54 AM

I can't answer the quiz, too many of the questions create what I believe to be a false dichotomy.

Clayton -

http://voluntaryistreader.wordpress.com
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Autolykos replied on Tue, May 29 2012 11:58 AM

Clayton:
I can't answer the quiz, too many of the questions create what I believe to be a false dichotomy.

I concur. I tried taking the quiz a decade ago, and came to much the same conclusion back then.

The keyboard is mightier than the gun.

Non parit potestas ipsius auctoritatem.

Voluntaryism Forum

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gotlucky replied on Tue, May 29 2012 12:26 PM

@Clayton and Autolykos

If Vive can take this quiz, so you can you.  Man up!

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Autolykos replied on Tue, May 29 2012 12:41 PM

I don't consider it a question of manhood, sorry.

The keyboard is mightier than the gun.

Non parit potestas ipsius auctoritatem.

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1. 

Immanuel Kant (100%)

  

 

  MORE

2. 

Ayn Rand (94%)

  

 

  MORE

3. 

John Stuart Mill (88%)

  

 

  MORE

4. 

Prescriptivism (81%)

  

 

  MORE

5. 

Thomas Aquinas (75%)

  

 

  MORE

6. 

Epicureans (64%)

  

 

  MORE

7. 

Aristotle (63%)

  

 

  MORE

8. 

Jean-Paul Sartre (60%)

  

 

  MORE

9. 

Jeremy Bentham (59%)

  

 

  MORE

10. 

William of Ockham (56%)

  

 

  MORE

11. 

Stoics (47%)

  

 

  MORE

12. 

Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (45%)

  

 

  MORE

13. 

Cynics (41%)

  

 

  MORE

14. 

Plato (41%)

  

 

  MORE

15. 

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (36%)

  

 

  MORE

16. 

Thomas Hobbes (32%)

  

 

  MORE

17. 

St. Augustine (30%)

  

 

  MORE

18. 

David Hume (27%)

  

 

  MORE

19. 

Nel Noddings (26%)

   
 

If I had a cake and ate it, it can be concluded that I do not have it anymore. HHH

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I have to say I clicked 'Doesn't Matter/Dislike' quite a lot. On every occasion it was because the question was too restrictive.

 

1.  Jeremy Bentham (100%)        MORE
2.  John Stuart Mill (100%)        MORE
3.  Epicureans (84%)        MORE
4.  Immanuel Kant (82%)        MORE
5.  Jean-Paul Sartre (70%)        MORE
6.  Prescriptivism (58%)        MORE
7.  Thomas Hobbes (46%)        MORE
8.  Thomas Aquinas (43%)        MORE
9.  Aristotle (43%)        MORE
10.  Ayn Rand (43%)        MORE

 

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Wheylous replied on Tue, May 29 2012 2:53 PM

You agree 88% with Hobbes?

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Serpentis-Lucis:

  1.  Ayn Rand (100%)        MORE
2.  Jean-Paul Sartre (95%)        MORE
3.  John Stuart Mill (94%)        MORE
4.  Aristotle (76%)        MORE
5.  Thomas Aquinas (74%)        MORE
6.  Jeremy Bentham (74%)        MORE
7.  Thomas Hobbes (66%)        MORE
8.  David Hume (66%)        MORE
9.  Cynics (60%)        MORE
10.  Epicureans (60%)        MORE
11.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (54%)        MORE
12.  Immanuel Kant (49%)        MORE
13.  Plato (48%)        MORE
14.  Stoics (46%)        MORE
15.  Nel Noddings (42%)        MORE
16.  St. Augustine (36%)        MORE
17.  Prescriptivism (29%)        MORE
18.  William of Ockham (27%)        MORE
19.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (25%)

I think you and I are the most closely aligned.

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MaikU replied on Tue, May 29 2012 4:25 PM
1.  Ayn Rand (100%)        MORE
2.  Stoics (84%)        MORE
3.  David Hume (73%)        MORE
4.  Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (69%)        MORE
5.  Jean-Paul Sartre (69%)        MORE
6.  Immanuel Kant (69%)        MORE
7.  Aristotle (65%)        MORE
8.  Cynics (64%)        MORE
9.  Thomas Aquinas (62%)        MORE
10.  St. Augustine (61%)        MORE
11.  Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (61%)        MORE
12.  John Stuart Mill (43%)        MORE
13.  Thomas Hobbes (41%)        MORE
14.  Plato (40%)        MORE
15.  Epicureans (38%)        MORE
16.  Jeremy Bentham (37%)        MORE
17.  Nel Noddings (33%)        MORE
18.  Prescriptivism (30%)        MORE
19.  William of Ockham (29%)

 

I didn't understand few questions, but still... Ayn Rand? I know very little about her, still, interesting ;D

"Dude... Roderick Long is the most anarchisty anarchist that has ever anarchisted!" - Evilsceptic

(english is not my native language, sorry for grammar.)

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1. 

Immanuel Kant (100%)

  

 

  MORE

2. 

Ayn Rand (94%)

  

 

  MORE

3. 

John Stuart Mill (88%)

  

 

  MORE

4. 

Prescriptivism (81%)

  

 

  MORE

5. 

Thomas Aquinas (75%)

  

 

  MORE

6. 

Epicureans (64%)

  

 

  MORE

7. 

Aristotle (63%)

  

 

  MORE

8. 

Jean-Paul Sartre (60%)

  

 

  MORE

9. 

Jeremy Bentham (59%)

  

 

  MORE

10. 

William of Ockham (56%)

  

 

  MORE

11. 

Stoics (47%)

  

 

  MORE

12. 

Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (45%)

  

 

  MORE

13. 

Cynics (41%)

  

 

  MORE

14. 

Plato (41%)

  

 

  MORE

15. 

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (36%)

  

 

  MORE

16. 

Thomas Hobbes (32%)

  

 

  MORE

17. 

St. Augustine (30%)

  

 

  MORE

18. 

David Hume (27%)

  

 

  MORE

19. 

Nel Noddings (26%)

   
 

If I had a cake and ate it, it can be concluded that I do not have it anymore. HHH

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Jargon replied on Tue, May 29 2012 7:42 PM

@Autolykos

Whatsa matter bro, your stones haven't dropped yet? (Joking)

 

1. Jean-Paul Sartre (100%)  
 
  MORE
2. Ayn Rand (99%)  
 
  MORE
3. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (72%)  
 
  MORE
4. Thomas Hobbes (69%)  
 
  MORE
5. David Hume (64%)  
 
  MORE
6. Cynics (61%)  
 
  MORE
7. Immanuel Kant (60%)  
 
  MORE
8. John Stuart Mill (53%)  
 
  MORE
9. Stoics (53%)  
 
  MORE
10. St. Augustine (52%)  
 
  MORE
11. Thomas Aquinas (51%)  
 
  MORE
12. Epicureans (50%)  
 
  MORE
13. Nel Noddings (48%)  
 
  MORE
14. Baruch (later known as Benedictus) Spinoza (47%)  
 
  MORE
15. Aristotle (43%)  
 
  MORE
16. Plato (43%)  
 
  MORE
17. Jeremy Bentham (40%)  
 
  MORE
18. William of Ockham (29%)  
 
  MORE
19. Prescriptivism (17%)  
 
 
Questions with choices like this "e) our intellect in general, but not to achieve desires. " make me sympathetic to Clayton and Auto though. Acting to the contrary of our desires is nonsense. Unless one defines 'desires' to be some very specific sect out of all possible wants to mean something like 'hookers and coke'.

 

Land & Liberty

The Anarch is to the Anarchist what the Monarch is to the Monarchist. -Ernst Jünger

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Autolykos replied on Tue, May 29 2012 10:17 PM

Jargon:
@Autolykos

Whatsa matter bro, your stones haven't dropped yet? (Joking)

I really don't understand your motivation for making such a joke. Perhaps you'd like to elucidate it.

The keyboard is mightier than the gun.

Non parit potestas ipsius auctoritatem.

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ThatOldGuy replied on Tue, May 29 2012 10:26 PM

Autolykos:
I really don't understand your motivation for making such a joke. Perhaps you'd like to elucidate it.

I think he's referring to this comment

If I had a cake and ate it, it can be concluded that I do not have it anymore. HHH

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You agree 88% with Hobbes?

lol, for some reason I find myself scratching out 12 of every 100 words Hobbes wrote the way you have this written, moreover I picture the words that are left talk about somethin along the lines of "Organs of man, leading to a Leviathan on man against man"

 

Anywho, gay jokes aside - Hobbes is a materialistic egoistic and in ways a predecessor of Austriansism / capitalism.  Also, gay innuendo aside, he is kind of funny to read.

 

 

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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My Buddy replied on Wed, May 30 2012 2:12 PM

I like how a bunch of Austrians on the Mises forum are getting Sartre as their closest candidate, when Sartre was basically a Communist.

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I like how a bunch of Austrians on the Mises forum are getting Sartre as their closest candidate, when Sartre was basically a Communist.

Probably becase those fashionable frenchmen used their philosophy as nothing more than fashionable words and trends to "shock the bourgoise" and subvert them any chincy way they knew how.

If you think of it heuristics, textual criticism, deconstrction, etc are very much in the realm of the market method and mentality.  They were idiot political savants who were using words to insert their own deus ex machina, not serious thinkers.  

As St Max says "our atheists are pious people".

Austrians actually take subjectivism, perpectivism, creative-destruction, etc seriously.  Austrians (and all relevant intellectual geneologies relating to it) precede, supercede, and excede anything those loopy neo-leftists have ever had to say.

They are mere pretenders and charltans who know how to mimic reality - the Austrians are the real McCoy and genuine article.  I wouldn't be surprised if 90% of their premises, conclusions, and methods could genuinely be stopped in it's tracks by the question "that's very interesting, but so what?"

 

 

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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Jargon replied on Wed, May 30 2012 10:17 PM

Vive you say things like Teutonic thought and relatives of Austrianism. What (or rather who) precisely do you mean by it?

BTW, started Capital and its Structure today.

Land & Liberty

The Anarch is to the Anarchist what the Monarch is to the Monarchist. -Ernst Jünger

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Just a bunch of Germans who deal with Idealism, Rationalism, Epistemology,  Subjectivism, and method.  It's not a formal category or anything - but people like Kant, Husserl, Webber, and Heidegger

Capital is a good read - it really helped me ground what is at the base of economic transactions - which is something that helps keep everything in perspective for me

Anyway I'm done twith this thread because I feel I may be hijacking it

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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Greg replied on Wed, May 30 2012 10:45 PM

I don't know much about philosophers, this seems like a good reading list for me though. Now how did Hobbes get there... social contract no . A couple of friends have recommended Nietzsche guess I'll have to give him a read.

 

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