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Private Courts and private police

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ianpeatfield Posted: Sat, Sep 29 2012 2:04 AM

Private Police

If you take the libetarian perspective given by Walter Block police and courts wouldn't be paid out of taxes. How would private police be able to afford to investigate child abuse as children wouldn't pay for their services? What about poor people that can't afford police insurance or other payments? Would the police have to rely on charity to fund these investigations?

Private Courts

How would the poor pay for courts in a libertarian world?

 

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The parents of the child will pay for the protection of their children. If the child is homeless, then private charity.

The ideal way it would work is not that youd pay private police directly, it would be more like the private provider of roads and streets will hire polic companies to patrol the streets (safe streets earn good profit).

Unless you have a special condition where you need to defend x piece of property, then you pay police directly.

Other than that id just see people paying road companies to keep safe and sound.

How would poor pay for courts? Just like theyd pay for any other type of service.

Well theres charity,

Free market competition will hopefully lower prices so that poor will be able to afford.

So for example, lets say ruritania street was built and maintained by x company. X company sees that it is more profitable to have safe roads as demand goes up for better and safer roads. X company hires y police to guard the road.

Poor man bob lives on the streetz (ruritania street), and some incident happens. If the police are present at the time, they would be required to help bob since it was the contract of x company to have y police to maintain the street.

 

“Since people are concerned that ‘X’ will not be provided, ‘X’ will naturally be provided by those who are concerned by its absence."
"The sweetest of minds can harbor the harshest of men.”

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Clayton replied on Sat, Sep 29 2012 3:13 AM

Hello and welcome to the forums. Thread for beginners.

children wouldn't pay for their services?

Extended family. Private children's charities (e.g. St. Jude's but for child protection).

What about poor people that can't afford police insurance or other payments?

Such services would likely be dirt-cheap if produced privately. Some charities might specialize in subsidizing them for poor people living in dangerous areas. Since security does produce a sort of "blanket" effect, people might move near the outskirts of highly protected facilities to enjoy the spillover benefits.

Would the police have to rely on charity to fund these investigations?

There wouldn't be the police. The combined functions of security and investigations performed by most public police departments would probably be produced separately, as they are today in the private market.

How would the poor pay for courts in a libertarian world?

People would probably be more polite - all things equal - since it's cheaper to be polite than to pay for resolving a needless dispute.

Courts, in my view, would not be able to compel participation in the legal process. Rather, a dispute would be heard by an arbitrator who would act more as a consultant/referee in assisting the disputants to reach their own agreement (what is today called a settlement).

Intransigent people, in my view, would be taken to be "waiving their right" to settle a matter peacefully. In other words, they are implicitly agreeing to settle the matter by force. Hence, if someone commits a crime then refuses to settle the dispute through legal channels, he can be killed or captured according to the laws regarding the appropriate use of force in the case of intransigence.

The poor might be able to sell their claims to bounty hunters. Finally, there might emerge charitable organizations that focus specifically on subsidizing legal services for the poor.

Clayton -

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We already have private police and courts.

You get a certificate of insolvent birth for a legal persona which verifies a trust which involves an estate [land of America] which owes a debt that can not be paid.  The purpose of the certificate is to disharge you and set you at liberty because people can not be imprisoned for debt.

Then you get a social security bond number which evidences the entity responsible for the bankruptcy owes you a debt.  If you look at the back of the card it says right on it you are the number holder.

When you take a certificate of insolvent birth + social security bond number + company seal = Incorporated State of ________ employee ID.

Then they just get you to believe everything is not in fact private companies based on contracts.  So if you want to know what libertarianism would look like... well look around you because everything is private and based on contracts now but the only difference would be that a libertarian society would not use tacit procuration to manufacture consent for contracts involving undisclosed terms and the companies you would want to do business with would be ones who provided honest disclosure.

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Wheylous replied on Sat, Sep 29 2012 2:38 PM

Let's cut the crap:

Currently, government expenditures on police and courts run about forty dollars a year per capita

That's in 1970.

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Wheylous replied on Sat, Sep 29 2012 2:39 PM

Overall, here is the info on private justice:

http://candlemind.com/projects/progclub/file/michael/getEducated.php?listID=16

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Let's cut the crap:

Yes, let's cut the crap.

The Incorporated United States IS a corporation.

An Incorporated State IS a corporation.

The only way a corporation can do business with you is a contract. 

Those are FACTS that are not in DISPUTE. 

Now I have been firm in belief everything is voluntary for many years but now I can precisely explain it and I will but it is going to be in the form of a book I profit from because I get tired of arguing with nonsense.  As soon as I get around to putting something on Kindle or Amazon I will let you know...

Clearly when there are full and honest disclosures it changes the market pricing dynamic and peoples choices.

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