Free Capitalist Network - Community Archive
Mises Community Archive
An online community for fans of Austrian economics and libertarianism, featuring forums, user blogs, and more.

Getting an economics degree without being indoctrinated

rated by 0 users
Answered (Not Verified) This post has 0 verified answers | 10 Replies | 6 Followers

Not Ranked
Male
16 Posts
Points 485
Atreides99 posted on Sun, Oct 14 2012 4:04 PM

I think an economics degree would be a good flexible degree to get and I am currently reading works by rothbard and watching seminars online about economics and economic history. This is a minnesota state school. What I am mostly worried about is what the macroeconomics courses are going to end up being like.

  • | Post Points: 65

All Replies

Top 50 Contributor
Male
2,439 Posts
Points 44,650

Do what I'm doing, just understand what is being said. If you can't see any fallacies in what is being said, then why assume that something is wrong with what is being said? If you do find problems with what is being said then consider it "a way that a group of people think about an issue", not the truth of the matter.

This is good advice with most issues.

At last those coming came and they never looked back With blinding stars in their eyes but all they saw was black...
  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Male
16 Posts
Points 485

Well I once saw a video explain different business cycles and he proposed that each of them is good to understand. Would something from the keynesian school or chicago school or neoclassical and so on in something like say a macro or micro economics book still be useful?

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 75 Contributor
1,612 Posts
Points 29,515

Well, expect mathematics (especially in macro and more and more the closer you get to graduation) and some stats and in your public health classes, if you take anything about taxation or regulatory issues, to expect the Bentham/Coase approach to social welfare (the "social margin").  Expect Keynes in banking, your textbooks will probably come from an adviser to one of the Fed banks.

Graduate studies seem oriented towards econometrics which means experiments requiring the very concepts Austrians abhor.  But they more than likely are the ones getting pretty high paying jobs...

I never once was directed towards or exposed to Friedman in any of my economics classes.  I didn't end up pursuing economics.

 

"The Fed does not make predictions. It makes forecasts..." - Mustang19
  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Male
16 Posts
Points 485

Well there is one econometrics class I have to take (I'm going for a BS). I would probably go to another university if I decided to to do graduate studies. Do you think even a basic econometrics would be worthless?

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Male
16 Posts
Points 485

this university from what I'm reading about their program seems to appreciate Friedman and Hayek and Adam smith so I may be exposed to those guys who I think are cool.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 500 Contributor
128 Posts
Points 2,945
Suggested by Cortes

Employers will not care about your economic philosophy.  They're only interested in the skills you bring to the table.  So perhaps to your dismay, the quantitative courses like econometrics, mathematical optimization, empirical finance, etc. will be most helpful for your job prospects.

 

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Male
4,987 Posts
Points 89,745

If you're actively trying to get a pro-market biased education, go with GMU.

Otherwise, learn the stuff in school and compare it to other authors outside of school.

Lastly, I recommend a Computer Science degree. Jobs are offered like hotcakes.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Male
3,113 Posts
Points 60,515
Esuric replied on Sun, Oct 14 2012 9:27 PM

A B.S. in economics hasn't done much for me. The stuff I learned in accounting turned out to be much more marketable in the labor market. 

"If we wish to preserve a free society, it is essential that we recognize that the desirability of a particular object is not sufficient justification for the use of coercion."

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Male
16 Posts
Points 485

Yeah i've been getting IT careers and accounting are great ideas for awhile now. So I'm thinking I might do an Information Systems degree since that has some accounting and business as well as programming software engineering etc. But I may pack an accounting minor onto it in the future  or get a certificate in network security if its convenient.

@Wheylous- Whats a GMU?

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
1,711 Posts
Points 29,285

George Mason University.

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (11 items) | RSS