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What are you reading?

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Jonathan M. F. Catalán Posted: Wed, Jan 12 2011 11:41 AM

I'm not sure if a threat like this has been made in the past, but I thought it would be interesting to show what we're reading.

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I'm currently reading Roger Garrison's Time and Money.  It's definately not what I thought it would be like (I was actually sort of let down); Garrison seems to put more emphasis on modelling general ideals, versus actually explaining the ideas completely.  For example, I thought that it would be an exposition (or include one) of capital theory similar to that of Hayek, but in more modern and concise writing — it turns out that the way he explains capital theory is in very broad strokes.  Most of the book actually has to do with judging alternative theories within the context of his capital theory modelling.

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Bert replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 11:52 AM

What I'm currently reading or about to finish:

Human, All Too Human, Sartre's Essays In Existentialism, and Vonnegut's Welcome to the Monkey House.

Got sidetracked:

Human Action, understandable how someone can get sidetracked with this.  500 pages in and the sections on prices slowed me down.  Yet, it already seems I've read a lot of the later chapters from Mises daily articles.  Last time I had read this was probably in September.

What's next:

Hegel's Philosophy of Right, and Early Writings by Marx, a collection of his early material such as his 1844 Manuscripts, ect.

I had always been impressed by the fact that there are a surprising number of individuals who never use their minds if they can avoid it, and an equal number who do use their minds, but in an amazingly stupid way. - Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols
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Rothbard's Power and Market, Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality, and Mises' Economic Calculation in the Socialist Commonwealth.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Danny Sanchez:

Rothbard's Power and Market, Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality, and Mises' Economic Calculation in the Socialist Commonwealth

Again? :)

The state is not the enemy. The idea of the state is. 

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Marko replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 12:38 PM

I am currently reading Hitler’s Police Battalions: Enforcing Racial War in the East.

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Jeff Tucker's Bourbon for Breakfast.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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fakename replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 3:45 PM

The Basic Works of Aristotle, and The Human Action Study Guide

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Finishing up James Buchanan's Cost and Choice while I dig into Kirzner's Competition and Entrepreneurship.

Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality is very high on my reading list, though I may put it (way) off to read The Theory of Moral Sentiments first.

"People kill each other for prophetic certainties, hardly for falsifiable hypotheses." - Peter Berger
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Economics for Real People by Gene Callahan, Mass Effect: Ascension by Drew Karpyshyn, and The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl Sagan.

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. - Carl Sagan
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William replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 4:25 PM

I have just started Shumperter's Imperialism. Lachmann's Capital and It's Structure.  I have been re reading Justice and It's Surroundings by De Jassay

"I am not an ego along with other egos, but the sole ego: I am unique. Hence my wants too are unique, and my deeds; in short, everything about me is unique" Max Stirner
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Anarcho replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 4:46 PM

Great Wars & Great Leaders A Libertarian Rebuttal by Ralph Raico and Making Economic Sense by Murray Rothbard.  I have just finished up A History of Money and Banking in the United States: The Colonial Era to World War II by Murray Rothbard and have to say it was an excellent read.

"It is easy to be conspicuously 'compassionate' if others are being forced to pay the cost." - Murray N. Rothbard.

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Elvis And Me by Priscilla Presley 

I used to love the King but now I despise him after learning that he did not love his wife.

Before calling yourself a libertarian or an anarchist, read this.  
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Michael J Green:

Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality is very high on my reading list, though I may put it (way) off to read The Theory of Moral Sentiments first.

I would seriously advise you not to do that. Although Moral Sentiments isn't bad per se, there is a real high oppurtunity cost and it's a long book and AS just writes really boring. And Foundations of Morality is really a genuine master piece in moral philosophy. I know of no work that argues for a rule-utilitarian perspective that is thàt good. 

The state is not the enemy. The idea of the state is. 

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David. replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 7:42 PM

I'm reading 'Joy of Cooking'. Reading this thread, you'd think that none of you read anything out of economics/philosophy.

I just finished reading 'Everything I want to do is illegal' by Joel Salatin. It was fantastic, all about farming in USA! Look it up on Amazon if you want to know more (then buy it).

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I'm reading Muscle, Smoke, and Mirrors by Randy Roach. Once I'm done with that, I'm gonna give Rework a shot.

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I am currently on and off Raghuram Ragan's Faultlines. A standard book so far, with not many original ideas, but I am giving it a shot.

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AdrianHealey:

Michael J Green:

Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality is very high on my reading list, though I may put it (way) off to read The Theory of Moral Sentiments first.

I would seriously advise you not to do that. Although Moral Sentiments isn't bad per se, there is a real high oppurtunity cost and it's a long book and AS just writes really boring. And Foundations of Morality is really a genuine master piece in moral philosophy. I know of no work that argues for a rule-utilitarian perspective that is thàt good. 

 

Also, Hazlitt covers that book extensively in FoM.  So, in addition to Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality being a masterpiece (so far, I definitely agree with that description) it would be a great primer on Smith's ethics that will inform your later reading of the latter.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Danny Sanchez:

AdrianHealey:

Michael J Green:

Hazlitt's Foundations of Morality is very high on my reading list, though I may put it (way) off to read The Theory of Moral Sentiments first.

I would seriously advise you not to do that. Although Moral Sentiments isn't bad per se, there is a real high oppurtunity cost and it's a long book and AS just writes really boring. And Foundations of Morality is really a genuine master piece in moral philosophy. I know of no work that argues for a rule-utilitarian perspective that is thàt good. 

Also, Hazlitt covers that book extensively in FoM.  So, in addition to it being a masterpiece (so far, I definitely agree with that description) it would be a great primer on Smith's ethics that will inform your later reading of the latter.

 
I consider Foundations of Morality on the same level as Anarchy, State and Utopia or A Theory of Justice. 

The state is not the enemy. The idea of the state is. 

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Reading "Human Natures" by Ehrlich and "The Third Chimpanzee" by Jared Diamond.

Based on a question I was recommended a book titled 'Elizabeth Anscombe’s Intention' by David Gordon which he claims is the best book he's ever read on intent. Anyone read it? 

Read until you have something to write...Write until you have nothing to write...when you have nothing to write, read...read until you have something to write...Jeremiah 

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Jeff Tucker's Bourbon for Breakfast.

How do you like that so far?

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I just finished The Road to Serfdom, I have to now decide which of these two books I'm going to read next: Rothbard's What Has Government Done to Our Money or Mises' Human Action. Any suggestions as to which one I should read first??

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freeradicals:

I just finished The Road to Serfdom, I have to now decide which of these two books I'm going to read next: Rothbard's What Has Government Done to Our Money or Mises' Human Action. Any suggestions as to which one I should read first??

 

Obviously it depends on how long and challenging of a book you are up for.  The Money book is really short.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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DanielMuff replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 10:39 PM

Enjoyable reading. So far, every essay has been about how the government lowers the quality of life (e.g. toilets, shower heads). I downloaded it to my phone.

To paraphrase Marc Faber: We're all doomed, but that doesn't mean that we can't make money in the process.
Rabbi Lapin: "Let's make bricks!"
Stephan Kinsella: "Say you and I both want to make a German chocolate cake."

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djussila replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 10:43 PM

Finished reading: Jeffrey Tucker's "Bourbon For Breakfast."

 

Currently reading: Stephen Hawking's "The Grand Design"

 

Planning to read: Hans-Hermann Hoppe's "Democracy: The God That Failed." 

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AdrianHealey:
I consider Foundations of Morality on the same level as Anarchy, State and Utopia or A Theory of Justice.

Danny Sanchez:
So, in addition to it being a masterpiece (so far, I definitely agree with that description)

Wow, bold praise. I don't see it mentioned very often, so I didn't think it was a huge deal; still, as I seem to lean towards Misesian utilitarianism, I've had my eye on it for a while now. Eager as I am to get TMS under my belt, I will read Hazlitt first.

"People kill each other for prophetic certainties, hardly for falsifiable hypotheses." - Peter Berger
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djussila replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 10:55 PM

Daniel Muffinburg:

Enjoyable reading. So far, every essay has been about how the government lowers the quality of life (e.g. toilets, shower heads). I downloaded it to my phone.

 

I really liked Jeffrey Tuckers Book. I think it's amazing how the most common and seemingly insignificant aspects of life can be analyzed through an Ancap perspective. Plus Jeff is a pretty nice guy in person so the book is double good in my view.  

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Student replied on Wed, Jan 12 2011 11:12 PM

keith richard's life

when i'm not reading selgin's theory of free banking. 

Ambition is a dream with a V8 engine - Elvis Presley

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Michael J Green:

AdrianHealey:
I consider Foundations of Morality on the same level as Anarchy, State and Utopia or A Theory of Justice.

Danny Sanchez:
So, in addition to it being a masterpiece (so far, I definitely agree with that description)

Wow, bold praise. I don't see it mentioned very often, so I didn't think it was a huge deal; still, as I seem to lean towards Misesian utilitarianism, I've had my eye on it for a while now. Eager as I am to get TMS under my belt, I will read Hazlitt first.

Well, as wonderful as they are, most present day prominent Misesians (God bless 'em), due to Rothbard's influence, subscribe to natural rights/natural law doctrine (either that or argumentation ethics), so you wouldn't expect them to cite it often.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Economics in One Lesson. Then I'm taking a break from an-cap to read Child of God by Cormac McCarthy. He's one of my favorite authors, so I'm sure I'll enjoy it.

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William replied on Thu, Jan 13 2011 2:22 AM

still, as I seem to lean towards Misesian utilitarianism

on a nitpick: Despite what Mises may have claimed I don't think he is technically a utilitarian, though he is a consequentialist (the two terms are often confused.)

"I am not an ego along with other egos, but the sole ego: I am unique. Hence my wants too are unique, and my deeds; in short, everything about me is unique" Max Stirner
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He was.  He just wasn't a Benthamite deontological "act" utilitarian (what Hazlitt refers to as "ad hoc utilitarianism").  He was an individualist, consequentialist, "rule" utilitarian.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Just ordered Hoppe's Democracy the God that Failed, I can't wait =)

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Merlin replied on Thu, Jan 13 2011 2:39 AM

“The Google way:  How One Company Is Revolutionizing Management As We Know It” by Bernard Girard, which is nice although I enjoyed far more David Thielen’s “The 12 simple secrets of Microsoft management”. As soon as I’m done I want to pick up something on organized crime. If you need some streamlined management tips, that’s the lace to look.

The Regression theorem is a memetic equivalent of the Theory of Evolution. To say that the former precludes the free emergence of fiat currencies makes no more sense that to hold that the latter precludes the natural emergence of multicellular organisms.
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Just got a $25 BN.com gift card from my sister, so I'll be reading J.R.R. Tolkien's The Simarillion on my Nook soon!  Now I have to figure out what to spend the remaining $15 on...

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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William replied on Thu, Jan 13 2011 4:33 AM

^^ Any specific genre on your mind?

"I am not an ego along with other egos, but the sole ego: I am unique. Hence my wants too are unique, and my deeds; in short, everything about me is unique" Max Stirner
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Not really.  I just need to plumb my brain for mental notes on non-free books I've been meaning to read.

"the obligation to justice is founded entirely on the interests of society, which require mutual abstinence from property" -David Hume
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Re-reading Plato's republic with specific reference to his educational ideas.

The atoms tell the atoms so, for I never was or will but atoms forevermore be.

Yours sincerely,

Physiocrat

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Michael J Green:

AdrianHealey:
I consider Foundations of Morality on the same level as Anarchy, State and Utopia or A Theory of Justice.

Danny Sanchez:
So, in addition to it being a masterpiece (so far, I definitely agree with that description)

Wow, bold praise. I don't see it mentioned very often, so I didn't think it was a huge deal; still, as I seem to lean towards Misesian utilitarianism, I've had my eye on it for a while now. Eager as I am to get TMS under my belt, I will read Hazlitt first.

I'm not a Misesian utilitarian per se - I do think the concept of a 'natural law' is a valid concept, although I consider 'The Ethics of Liberty's relationship to political philosophy as 'economics in one lesson' is to economics - but I don't think Hazlitt makes the typical rule utilitarian mistake of saying that there can be no science of 'ought'. There can be and he makes a damn good case for it. Weakest chapters in the book are, imo, however 'the ethics of capitalism' and 'the ethics of socialism'. 

The state is not the enemy. The idea of the state is. 

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I'm currently reading - Justice and its Surroundings by Anthony de Jasay, and rereading Human Action. For anyone else that has read Justice and its Surroundings what do you make of Chapter 5 (the very short chapter). Unless I've read it wrongly it seems a little incongruous, and quite statist.

I'm also reading a fascinating fiction book called Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde. It's a vision of a future dystopia in which society is organised and formed into a hierarchy by the citizen's colour perception. I'm not very far through it so I don't want to make a judgement yet.

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JohnnyFive:

I'm currently reading - Justice and its Surroundings by Anthony de Jasay, and rereading Human Action. For anyone else that has read Justice and its Surroundings what do you make of Chapter 5 (the very short chapter). Unless I've read it wrongly it seems a little incongruous, and quite statist.

Poke min in a private message if I don't get back to you on this in 24 hours. 

The state is not the enemy. The idea of the state is. 

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