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Tractus-Logico: 2.1-2.225

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vive la insurrection Posted: Wed, Apr 25 2012 2:26 PM

This is part 3 of the tractus. The mother thread to this discussion can be founde here:

http://mises.org/Community/forums/t/28879.aspx

2.1 We make to ourselves pictures of facts.
 
2.11 The picture presents the facts in logical space, the existence and
non-existence of atomic facts.
 
2.12 The picture is a model of reality.
 
2.13 To the objects correspond in the picture the elements of the
picture.
 
2.131 The elements of the picture stand, in the picture, for the objects.
 
2.14 The picture consists in the fact that its elements are combined
with one another in a definite way.
 
2.141 The picture is a fact.
 
2.15 That the elements of the picture are combined with one another
in a definite way, represents that the things are so combined
with one another.This connexion of the elements of the picture is called its
structure, and the possibility of this structure is called the form
of representation of the picture.
 
2.151 The form of representation is the possibility that the things are
combined with one another as are the elements of the picture.
 
2.1511 Thus the picture is linked with reality; it reaches up to it.
 
2.1512 It is like a scale applied to reality.
 
2.15121 Only the outermost points of the dividing lines touch the object
to be measured.
 
2.1513 According to this view the representing relation which makes it
a picture, also belongs to the picture.
 
2.1514 The representing relation consists of the co-ordinations of the
elements of the picture and the things.
 
2.1515 These co-ordinations are as it were the feelers of its elements
with which the picture touches reality.
 
2.16 In order to be a picture a fact must have something in common
with what it pictures.
 
2.161 In the picture and the pictured there must be something identical in order that the one can be a picture of the other at all.
 
2.17 What the picture must have in common with reality in order to
be able to represent it after its manner—rightly or falsely—is its
form of representation.
 
2.171 The picture can represent every reality whose form it has.
The spatial picture, everything spatial, the coloured, everything coloured, etc.
 
2.172 The picture, however, cannot represent its form of representation; it shows it forth.
 
2.173 The picture represents its object from without (its standpoint is
its form of representation), therefore the picture represents its
object rightly or falsely.
 
2.174 But the picture cannot place itself outside of its form of representation.
 
2.18 What every picture, of whatever form, must have in common
with reality in order to be able to represent it at all—rightly or
falsely—is the logical form, that is, the form of reality.
 
2.181 If the form of representation is the logical form, then the picture
is called a logical picture.
 
2.182 Every picture is also a logical picture. (On the other hand, for
example, not every picture is spatial.)
 
2.19 The logical picture can depict the world.
 
2.2 The picture has the logical form of representation in common
with what it pictures.
 
2.201 The picture depicts reality by representing a possibility of the
existence and non-existence of atomic facts.
 
2.202 The picture represents a possible state of affairs in logical space.
 
2.203 The picture contains the possibility of the state of affairs which
it represents.
 
2.21 The picture agrees with reality or not; it is right or wrong, true
or false.
 
2.22 The picture represents what it represents, independently of its
truth or falsehood, through the form of representation.
 
2.221 What the picture represents is its sense.
 
2.222 In the agreement or disagreement of its sense with reality, its
truth or falsity consists.
 
2.223 In order to discover whether the picture is true or false we must
compare it with reality.
 
2.224 It cannot be discovered from the picture alone whether it is true
or false.
 
2.225 There is no picture which is a priori true.
 
 

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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Here we start to go into picture theory, which is going to lead up to the "meat" of Tractus; the proposition.

I'll get more into this a bit later when I have the time

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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I havent forgotten about this - I'm bumping this, because I do have something to say.

It's just finals, and long hours at work so this week I'm a bit busy.

If whomever wants to move to the next grouping please do, just create the thread

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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...I do have something to say.

All ears.

 

My humble blog

It's easy to refute an argument if you first misrepresent it. William Keizer

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If you have specific concerns or questions let me know, and I will try to help you.  At best I am a talented amature, either way, I am certainly no expert on Witt, philosophy, etc

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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AJ replied on Fri, May 4 2012 12:41 AM

Replace every instance of "true" with "useful," and the picture becomes clearer: these are actually guideposts (in all five senses, not just visual) for navigating reality. A useful definition of "thinking" is "manipulating the guideposts." Logic refers to the innate physical structure of those pictures/guideposts or the consequences of that structure in terms of how it can be manipulated (you cannot go through a wall but you can go around it, or perhaps break a hole in it). As an aside, the usual logic (with words; propositional logic) is better called "grammatical and semantic transforms."

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