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  • Re: The Natural Rights Approach: A Blatant Contradiction

    [quote]Utility maximization is an artificial construct, but it relates to something very real and tangible: prosperity for the people. Rather, utility is simply another way of stating a tautological argument; what is best for the people is best for the people. Utility only defines best. Of course, liberty maximization for the most part coincides with
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Thu, Apr 17 2008
  • Re: My Professor's Email Concerning True Wealth which lies in Talent. Can anyone respond?

    I am somewhat in shock. This guy is an economics professor? Or is he a philosophy professor, even more ignorant of economics than most of them? An economist, in his capacity as such, should know better than to criticize the preferences of people.
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Inquisitor on Thu, Apr 17 2008
  • Re: ID verification under anarchy

    Sure, governments definitely do contribute to impeding trade, but they also contribute to inefficiently wasting resources on projects that the market would otherwise not fund, but benefit the ruling political class nonetheless. Certain firms within certain industries are definitely favoured by government activities (and this applies without conceding
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: Nature Preserves

    Property only belongs to someone once they've established an objective link to it that in part justifies their holding it. if this link should vanish over time, the justification for their holding it dissipates too.
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: ID verification under anarchy

    Charles Anthony has a point IMO. E.g., in transportation the State funded the construction of massive highways, making cars more viable. State activities affect and distort the market, like it or not. Would the market have done the same? Maybe, maybe not. It might be unchanged in certain regards, and wholly different in others. State capitalism is surely
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: Neighborhood associations

    Fine, but you are still making a conceptual mistake. You're trying to say that because a good can be represented in terms of its aggregate value (i.e. prices), that if it is damaged you should be given enough to buy it back at its going price, or restore it to its former level. How does this show you own its value? What is value? It is what individuals
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: Fed Presentation

    Well, Roger Garrison's Time and Money would be the obvious suggestion. Dr Reisman has his own work on macroeconomics, but it's not mainstream Austrian, as a caution.
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: The Natural Rights Approach: A Blatant Contradiction

    [quote]Why the unhealthy obsession with 'rights'? My stance on government or the lack thereof is that whatever societal arrangement occurs it should maximize utility. Utility can be diminished without harming the abstract artificial construct of 'rights'. Something is bad if it decreasese the overall utility of the society, irrespective
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: Neighborhood associations

    The point of restitution is to allow you to gain the good that was destroyed back. You will be reimbursed enough to buy the good back. Again, it is the good and not its value that is being replaced. The same applies in the case of a unique painting - you ought to be reimbursed as much as you spent on it, accounting for inflation &c. I suppose if
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
  • Re: The Natural Rights Approach: A Blatant Contradiction

    There's another way of looking at it - that a given society A following x set of rules may involve some being better off and no one worse off than society B following y set of rules; in this sense, Pareto optimality can be maintained in spite of interdependence. Contractarians usually argue on such grounds.
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Inquisitor on Wed, Apr 16 2008
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