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  • Re: Property ownerless as a result of aggression

    As you say, documents just record ownership, they don't establish it. The aggressor is in the same position as anyone else who finds some property which he believes might be unowned. He could just take it right away, assuming there's no one out there with a claim on it. He could try to do some research so that he can be confident that no one
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Minarchist on Sat, Dec 1 2012
  • Re: Property ownerless as a result of aggression

    My point was that the aggressor can legitimately homestead the unowned land of his victim, he becomes the rightful owner of the land. He is liable for the murder, that is all. His homesteading of unowned land is a separate issue. He cannot be considered to be stealing it, precisely because it has no owner.
    Posted to Political Theory (Forum) by Minarchist on Sat, Dec 1 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    [quote user="z1235"]Minarchist, I thought you had a problem with Rothbard's plan. I never said his plan was bad, btw.[/quote] I do have concerns about Rothbard's plan, about it's potentially inflationary consequences, though I am less concerned now than when I started the thread. In light of Graham's point about forex markets
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Sat, Dec 1 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    [quote user="z1235"]And perhaps you should question the wisdom in seeking yet another state-centered solution for your problem.[/quote] Huh? Under Rothbard's plan all the State does is give away its gold and allow free banking : i.e. giving away property which it stole decades ago, rather than selling it for profits it does not deserve
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Fri, Nov 30 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    When did I mention that the gov must exchange FRNs for gold at a certain price? Sorry, I had you mixed up with Phi, who had mentioned the government selling its gold stocks either at a fixed price or by auction. But, I assume you want to get that gold out of government hands as well, no? Or is it just going to sit there in the NY Fed vaults indefinitely
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Fri, Nov 30 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    So we have the US government accepting FRN for gold at a certain price, while the Fed prints up enough money to ensure that all depositors can get their money out of the banks and exchange it for gold at that same price. This sounds like a more roundabout version of the Rothbard plan, no? The only difference is that, instead of shipping gold to the
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Thu, Nov 29 2012
  • Re: Free Will and Libertarianism.

    Life is as if human beings have free-will. Whether we really do or not is irrelevant for political philosophy, in my opinion. Whether there is really a shoe in front of me, as part of objective reality, or whether there is only a phenomenon, is irrelevant in discussions of who owns the shoe. Likewise, whether Bob really was free to kill Jones, or it
    Posted to General (Forum) by Minarchist on Thu, Nov 29 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    Not to ignore the rest of your post, but right now I want to focus on this: As for how to get a free market in banking with my proposal, I feel that it is built into what I have suggested. I'd assume that with my proposed change in legal tender laws, the demand for gold and silver would increase, and the demand for federal reserve notes would decrease
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Thu, Nov 29 2012
  • Re: The Mechanics of Returning to a Gold Standard

    If you repeal legal tender and capital gains laws, you expect a market-chosen money to start replacing federal reserve notes, as the federal reserve notes rapidly depreciate against that new money and against goods and services, correct? So what happens with the banking system - people are going to either (a) leave their savings in the banks as federal
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Thu, Nov 29 2012
  • Re: Basic: Why would interest rates go up when people save less in a free market economy? (In a

    But there's money which is entirely outside the banking system (physical paper notes and coins) and the quantity of this money varies. If people are spending more and saving less, money moves out of the banking system altogether (not just from one bank to another) and into circulating cash. Eventually, this cash will make it back to some bank, yes
    Posted to Economics Questions (Forum) by Minarchist on Thu, Nov 29 2012
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