Free Capitalist Network - Community Archive
Mises Community Archive
An online community for fans of Austrian economics and libertarianism, featuring forums, user blogs, and more.

IP vs. war prisoners - I just realized this - it's ridiculous!

This post has 1 Reply | 0 Followers

Top 10 Contributor
Male
Posts 4,987
Points 89,745
Wheylous Posted: Thu, Oct 25 2012 7:34 AM

I just discovered a major insanity in mainstream political theory.

Writers of books get automatic recognition of their "rights" to their books, but people who are not citizens of the US do not receive basic constitutional protections such as the right to a speedy/public trial? Seriously?

The inconsistency is as follows: Supposedly, people not in the US are not "given" protected rights by the Constitution and the US government. But in the meantime, authors get copyright protection? So IP matters and people's lives (like supposed terrorists in Guantanamo) don't?

Wow. This is a biiiig inconsistency. I'm fairly sure this could be a very powerful tool to break apart the statist nationalist mindset.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 814
Points 16,290

IP has always been nationalist... the Nazis loved it as did the National Socialist Henry Clay. Meanwhile, John C Calhoun hated it.  I find it ridiculous how so many nationalists are complaining that "China doesn't have respect for IP".  Well then, don't complain about getting Chinese goods dumped on you then.  The U.S. gov has repeated the same problems it had with Japan... except that with China, those nationalist mistakes will be the ultimate downfall of the U.S. govt and Japan.

Anyway, I see it as follows:

the state has always had privileges and they've always come at the expense of its subjects.   An example would be a cause of the War of 1812... the U.S. gov has no rights, but especially not to wage war over American naval sailors being impressed after the U.S. gov ordered them away (on to the high seas).  The state has always been inconsistent. 

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (2 items) | RSS