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Best Approach for Reading Human Action?

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thetabularasa posted on Fri, Jan 4 2013 6:31 PM

I'm really enjoying Austrian literature, but I started undertaking Human Action and Man, State, and Economy, and these texts are massive!

For those who've read either of them, do you reference them vs. read them word-for-word? What's the best way to tackle these texts?

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The best method is to read from left to right from the first page through the last page.

In all seriousness, we've set up a reading group for MES over at Liberty HQ, Wheylous' site. We plan on reading about a chapter each week with question and discussion of important concepts. Here's the link for the first chapter thread.

If I had a cake and ate it, it can be concluded that I do not have it anymore. HHH

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Thanks for the link, TOG.

I, too, would recommend reading MES with us :) We're also using Murphy's study guide.

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For Human Action, I recommend having a notebook handy to jot down things you think about or want to note. I went through about 5, though I didn't finish the book quickly. Overall I think the learning experience was more fruitful that way though.

"When the King is far the people are happy."  Chinese proverb

For Alexander Zinoviev and the free market there is a shared delight:

"Where there are problems there is life."

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I have lots of left-over Christmas money, and I plan on buying Human Action (or perhaps Man, Economy and State, I heard that it was made specifically as a prelude to Human Action or something).

Anyway, I would like to read with you all as well, hopefully I'm still liked enough around here to where that can happen.

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SM, what are you talking about? We obviously like you...

I'm not kidding, either. You're just a really good sport to mess with.

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The best way to read it is to probably treat it like you would any school text.  There is a study guide you can buy, that would help too.

You probably will want to read each chapter 2-3 times - on the 1st time through, just force yourself to read through the chapter and don't worry too much about what you are comprehending, just keep reading.

also:

study groups and online lectures are great, but it's still probably best to enter them with having read the required chapters once or twice beforehand

"As in a kaleidoscope, the constellation of forces operating in the system as a whole is ever changing." - Ludwig Lachmann

"When A Man Dies A World Goes Out of Existence"  - GLS Shackle

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Bert replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:56 PM

I didn't hit a speed bump til I got to prices, and that felt like forever, but I happened to have read excerpts from the early and later chapters online.  I think it may come down to reading something that grabs you, like worldview elements in regards to Austrian econ, and something that can potentially bore you, like actual in depth theory regarding prices and business cycle theory.  Some of it may seem enlightening, and some of it may seem dry, but it is a magnus opus on econ theory.  Just don't rush through it.

I had always been impressed by the fact that there are a surprising number of individuals who never use their minds if they can avoid it, and an equal number who do use their minds, but in an amazingly stupid way. - Carl Jung, Man and His Symbols
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I haven't read it yet, but maybe when you get to a section you don't understand pick up a book or watch a speech or something on that subject.

For example, if you don't fully understand austrian business cycle theory when you get to that section, put down Human Action and pick up something like The Austrian Theory of the Trade Cycle.

You could also watch the 11 video introduction to austrian economics featuring Hulsmann and Hoppe found on Nielsio's Youtube channel. I've only watched clips,but it looks good.

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What's the difference between regular Human Action and the scholar's edition?
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